Thomas Potter (1740–1801)

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Thomas Potter (1740–1801) was a British lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1776 to 1780.

The House of Commons is the elected lower house of the bicameral parliaments of the United Kingdom and Canada and historically was the name of the lower houses of the Kingdom of England, Kingdom of Great Britain, Kingdom of Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Southern Ireland. Roughly equivalent bodies in other countries which were once part of the British Empire include the United States House of Representatives, the Australian House of Representatives, the New Zealand House of Representatives, and India's Lok Sabha.

Potter was the only son of Thomas Potter and his first wife Anne Manningham daughter of Rev. Thomas Manningham, rector of Slinfold, Sussex. He was educated at Eton College from 1753 to 1754 and was admitted at Emmanuel College, Cambridge on 14 October 1756. He was admitted at Lincolns Inn on 13 May 1767 and called to the bar on 2 July 1772. He married Miss Grove, of Ridgmont, Bedfordshire on. 6 May 1761. [1]

Thomas Potter (died 1759) British politician, died 1759

Thomas Potter (1718–1759) was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1747 and 1759.

Eton College British independent boarding school located in Eton

Eton College is an English 13–18 independent boarding school and sixth form for boys in the parish of Eton, near Windsor in Berkshire. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as Kynge's College of Our Ladye of Eton besyde Windesore , as a sister institution to King's College, Cambridge, making it the 18th-oldest Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference school.

Emmanuel College, Cambridge college of the University of Cambridge

Emmanuel College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. The college was founded in 1584 by Sir Walter Mildmay, Chancellor of the Exchequer to Elizabeth I.

Potter was returned unopposed as Member of Parliament for Lostwithiel as an Administration candidate on Lord Edgcumbe's interest at a by-election on 28 November 1776. In 1778 he was appointed Second justice of Anglesey, a post he held until his death. He does not appear to have spoken in Parliament. He did not stand again at the 1780 general election. [2]

Lostwithiel was a rotten borough in Cornwall which returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons in the English and later British Parliament from 1304 to 1832, when it was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

1780 British general election

The 1780 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 15th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The election was held during the American War of Independence and returned Lord North to form a new government with a small and rocky majority. The opposition consisted largely of the Rockingham Whigs, the Whig faction led by the Marquess of Rockingham. North's opponents referred to his supporters as Tories, but no Tory party existed at the time and his supporters rejected the label.

Potter became a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and Fellow of the Royal Society in 1784. [3] He died in Harley Street on 14 November 1801. [1]

Society of Antiquaries of London British learned society for archaeologists

The Society of Antiquaries of London (SAL) is a learned society "charged by its Royal Charter of 1751 with 'the encouragement, advancement and furtherance of the study and knowledge of the antiquities and history of this and other countries'." It is based at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London, and is a registered charity.

Fellow of the Royal Society Elected Fellow of the Royal Society, including Honorary, Foreign and Royal Fellows

Fellowship of the UK Royal Society is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of London judges to have made a 'substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowledge, including mathematics, engineering science, and medical science'.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Potter, Thomas (PTR756T)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. "POTTER, Thomas (1740-1801), of Ridgmont, Beds". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 4 November 2017.
  3. "Fellow Details". Royal Society. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Viscount Fairford
Charles Brett
Member of Parliament for Lostwithiel
1776–1780
With: Viscount Fairford
Succeeded by
Hon. John St. John
Hon. Thomas de Grey