Thomas Powys, 3rd Baron Lilford

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The Lord Lilford
Born2 December 1801 (1801-12-02)
Died15 March 1861 (1861-03-16) (aged 59)
NationalityBritish
Other namesThomas Powys, 3rd Baron Lilford
Occupation Lord-in-waiting
Known for3rd Baron Lilford

Thomas Atherton Powys, 3rd Baron Lilford (2 December 1801 – 15 March 1861), was a British peer and Whig politician.

Lilford was the son of Thomas Powys, 2nd Baron Lilford, and Henrietta Maria Atherton of Atherton Hall. [1] He succeeded his father as third Baron Lilford in 1825. In 1837 he was appointed a Lord-in-waiting (government whip in the House of Lords) in the Whig administration of Lord Melbourne, a post he held until the government fell in August 1841. He never returned to office.

Thomas Powys, 2nd Baron Lilford British peer

Thomas Powys, 2nd Baron Lilford was a British peer. He was the son of Thomas Powys, 1st Baron Lilford and Mary Mann of Lilford Hall. He succeeded his father as Baron Lilford in 1800. He was educated at Eton College, St John's College, Cambridge and Lincoln's Inn (1794). He married Henrietta Maria Vernon Atherton of Atherton Hall, Leigh on 5 December 1797 at Penwortham, Lancashire and they had twelve children.

Atherton Hall, Leigh

Atherton Hall was a country house and estate in Atherton historically a part of Lancashire, England. The hall was built between 1723 and 1742 and demolished in 1824. In 1894 this part of Atherton was incorporated into Leigh. Christopher Saxton's map shows there was a medieval deer park here in the time of Elizabeth I.

Baron Lilford

Baron Lilford, of Lilford in the County of Northampton, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1797 for Thomas Powys, who had previously represented Northamptonshire in the House of Commons. His grandson, the third Baron, served as a Lord-in-waiting from 1837 to 1841 in the Whig administration of Lord Melbourne. He was succeeded by his son, the fourth Baron. He was an ornithologist. On the death of his younger son, the sixth Baron, in 1949, the line of the eldest son of the second Baron failed. The late Baron was succeeded by his second cousin once removed, the seventh Baron. He was the great-great-grandson of the Hon. Robert Vernon Powys, second son of the second Baron. As of 2010 the title is held by his only son, the eighth Baron, who succeeded in 2005. The family seat from 1711 until the 1990s was Lilford Hall in Northamptonshire. The current Baron Lilford retains ownership of land in Jersey, South Africa and West Lancashire including the Bank Hall Estate, which were inherited in 1860 by Thomas Atherton Powys, 3rd Baron Lilford upon the death of his wife's cousin George Anthony Legh Keck.

Lord Lilford married the Hon. Mary Elizabeth Fox, daughter of Henry Vassall-Fox, 3rd Baron Holland, and Lady Holland, in 1830, and had ten children. [2] He inherited Lilford Hall in Northamptonshire from his father in 1825. In 1860, he inherited Bank Hall in Bretherton, Lancashire, on the death of his brother-in-law George Anthony Legh Keck. A year after inheriting he died in March 1861, aged 59, and was succeeded by his eldest son Thomas, a prominent ornithologist. Lady Lilford died in 1891.

Henry Vassall-Fox, 3rd Baron Holland English politician

Henry Richard Vassall-Fox, 3rd Baron Holland, of Holland, and 3rd Baron Holland, of Foxley PC was an English politician and a major figure in Whig politics in the early 19th century. A grandson of Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland, and nephew of Charles James Fox, he served as Lord Privy Seal between 1806 and 1807 in the Ministry of All the Talents headed by Lord Grenville and as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster between 1830 and 1834 and again between 1835 and his death in 1840 in the Whig administrations of Lord Grey and Lord Melbourne.

Elizabeth Fox, Baroness Holland Political hostess, wife of Henry Vassall-Fox, 3rd Baron Holland

Elizabeth Vassall Fox, Baroness Holland was an English political hostess and the wife of Whig politician Henry Vassall-Fox, 3rd Baron Holland. With her husband, and after his death, she hosted political and literary gatherings at their home, Holland House.

Lilford Hall Grade I listed stately home in East Northamptonshire, United Kingdom

Lilford Hall is a Grade I listed stately home in Northamptonshire in the United Kingdom. It was started in 1495 as a Tudor building, with a major Jacobean exterior extension added in 1635 and a Georgian interior adopted in the 1740s, having a 55,000 sq ft (5,100 m2) floor area. The 100-room house is located in the eastern part of the County of Northamptonshire, south of Oundle and north of Thrapston. A Grade I listed building is considered by the UK government as of outstanding architectural and historic interest.

Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Thomas Lilford
Baron Lilford
1825–1861
Succeeded by
Thomas Littleton Powys

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References

Notes

  1. Biography of 3rd Baron Lilford, Lilford Hall, retrieved 25 July 2010
  2. Tim Powys-Lybbe (2011) "Thomas Atherton Powys Lord Lilford", http://www.tim.ukpub.net/pl_tree/ps09/ps09_280.html