Thomas Priestley

Last updated

Thomas Priestley is the name of:

Thomas James Montgomery Priestley, also known as Tommy Priestley or Tom Priestley was a Northern Irish footballer who played at both professional and international levels as a striker.

Tom Priestley is a film and sound editor whose career spans 1961 to 1990. He is the only son of author J.B. Priestley.

Related Research Articles

Joseph Priestley English theologian, chemist, educator, and political theorist

Joseph Priestley was an 18th-century English Separatist theologian, natural philosopher, chemist, innovative grammarian, multi-subject educator, and liberal political theorist who published over 150 works. He has historically been credited with the discovery of oxygen, having isolated it in its gaseous state, although Carl Wilhelm Scheele and Antoine Lavoisier also have strong claims to the discovery.

J. B. Priestley English writer

John Boynton Priestley, OM, known by his pen name J.B. Priestley, was an English novelist, playwright, scriptwriter, social commentator and broadcaster.

Jason Priestley Canadian-American actor

Jason Bradford Priestley is a Canadian-American actor and director. He is best known as the virtuous Brandon Walsh on the television series Beverly Hills, 90210 (1990–2000) and for his role starring as Richard "Fitz" Fitzpatrick in the show Call Me Fitz (2010–2013).

Carbonated water water containing dissolved carbon dioxide gas

Carbonated water or soda water is water containing dissolved carbon dioxide gas, either artificially injected under pressure or occurring due to natural geologic processes. Carbonation causes small bubbles to form, giving the water an effervescent quality. Common forms include sparkling natural mineral water, club soda, and commercially produced sparkling water.

Priestley Riots

The Priestley Riots took place from 14 July to 17 July 1791 in Birmingham, England; the rioters' main targets were religious dissenters, most notably the politically and theologically controversial Joseph Priestley. Both local and national issues stirred the passions of the rioters, from disagreements over public library book purchases, to controversies over Dissenters' attempts to gain full civil rights and their support of the French Revolution.

Priestley Glacier

The Priestley Glacier is a major valley glacier, about 96 km (60 mi) long, originating at the edge of the polar plateau of Victoria Land. The glacier drains southeast between the Deep Freeze and Eisenhower ranges to enter the northern end of the Nansen Ice Sheet.

Priestley Medal award

The Priestley Medal is the highest honor conferred by the American Chemical Society (ACS) and is awarded for distinguished service in the field of chemistry. Established in 1922, the award is named after Joseph Priestley, the discoverer of oxygen who immigrated to the United States of America in 1794. The ACS formed in 1876, spearheaded by a group of chemists who had met two years previously in Priestley's home.

Dennis Priestley English darts player

Dennis Priestley is a retired English professional darts player. He has won two world championships, and was the first player to win both the BDO and WDC world championships, in 1991 and 1994 respectively. He is nicknamed "The Menace", after the cartoon character Dennis the Menace, and reflects this by wearing red and black, and using red and black flights.

Priestley College

Priestley Sixth Form and Community College is a sixth form college in the Wilderspool district of Warrington, Cheshire. It also offers adult courses and professional training on another site, and is an associate college of the University of Salford.

Bradford Playhouse theatre and former cinema in Bradford, England

The Bradford Playhouse is a 290-seat proscenium arch theatre with circle and stall seating based in Little Germany, in the city of Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. Formerly known as The Priestley, the theatre also has a studio space that has flexible lighting, sound and seating arrangements.

Brian Priestley British musician

Brian Priestley is an English jazz writer, pianist and arranger.

Joseph Priestley House The American home of Joseph Priestley

The Joseph Priestley House was the American home of 18th-century British theologian, Dissenting clergyman, natural philosopher, educator, and political theorist Joseph Priestley (1733–1804) from 1798 until his death. Located in Northumberland, Pennsylvania, the house, which was designed by Priestley's wife Mary, is Georgian with Federalist accents. The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) operated it as a museum dedicated to Joseph Priestley from 1970 to August 2009, when it closed due to low visitation and budget cuts. The house reopened in October 2009, still owned by the PHMC but operated by the Friends of Joseph Priestley House (FJPH).

Joseph Priestley and education

Joseph Priestley was a British natural philosopher, Dissenting clergyman, political theorist, and theologian. While his achievements in all of these areas are renowned, he was also dedicated to improving education in Britain; he did this on an individual level and through his support of the Dissenting academies. His grammar textbook was innovative and highly influential. More importantly, though, Priestley introduced a liberal arts curriculum at Warrington Academy, arguing that a practical education would be more useful to students than a classical one. He was also the first to advocate the study and teaching of modern history, an interest driven by his belief that humanity was improving and could bring about Christ's Millennium.

Joseph Priestley and Dissent

Joseph Priestley was a British natural philosopher, political theorist, clergyman, theologian, and educator. He was one of the most influential Dissenters of the late 18th-century.

Sir Raymond Edward Priestley MC was a British geologist and early Antarctic explorer. He was Vice-Chancellor of the University of Birmingham, where he helped found The Raymond Priestley Centre on the shores of Coniston Water in the Lake District National Park.

<i>They Came to a City</i> 1945 film by Basil Dearden

They Came to a City is a 1944 British film directed by Basil Dearden adapted from a J. B. Priestley play. It stars John Clements, Googie Withers, Raymond Huntley, Renee Gadd, A. E. Matthews and others, and is notable for including a cameo guest appearance by Priestley as himself. The plot concerns the experiences of various people who have come to live in their "ideal" city, and explores their hopes and reasons for doing so. Many of the cast had also performed their roles in the original stage play. The film's art direction was by Michael Relph.

Robert Priestley was an American set decorator. He won two Academy Awards and was nominated for another in the category Best Art Direction.

To Priestley

"To Priestley" is a sonnet by Samuel Taylor Coleridge first published in the 11 December 1794 Morning Chronicle. Like most of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters, "To Priestley" addresses an individual Coleridge particularly admired; Joseph Priestley held many political and theological beliefs that Coleridge adopted during this time.

Priestley (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Priestley is an impact crater in the Eridania quadrangle of Mars, located at 54.4°S latitude and 229.4°W longitude. It measures 41.9 kilometers in diameter and was named after English clergyman and scientist Joseph Priestley. The naming was approved by IAU's Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature in 1973.

Nigel Priestley New Zealand earthquake engineer

Michael John Nigel Priestley was a New Zealand earthquake engineer. He made significant contributions to the design and retrofit of concrete structures, and developed the first displacement-based method of seismic design.