Thomas Pury (younger)

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Thomas Pury
Born 1619
Died 1693, age 73
Alma mater Magdalen Hall, Oxford
Occupation Politician
Known for MP for Monmouth Boroughs in the Long Parliament

Thomas Pury (1619 – 1693) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1640 to 1653. He supported the Parliamentarian cause in the English Civil War.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

English Civil War series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

History

Pury was the son of Thomas Pury of Gloucestershire. He matriculated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford on 18 November 1635 aged 16. He was admitted at Grays Inn on 29 January 1641. He was employed by Mr Townshend of Staples Inn in 1642 and was receiver of King's rents in Gloucestershire and WIltshire. He was clerk of peace for Gloucestershire and Captain of foot and horse in the parliamentary army. [1]

Thomas Pury was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1640 and 1659. He fought on the Parliamentarian side in the English Civil War.

In December 1646, Pury was elected Member of Parliament for Monmouth Boroughs in the Long Parliament. [2] He survived Pride's Purge and sat in the Rump Parliament.

Monmouth Boroughs was a parliamentary constituency consisting of several towns in Monmouthshire. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliaments of England, Great Britain, and finally the United Kingdom; until 1832 the constituency was known simply as Monmouth, though it included other "contributory boroughs".

Long Parliament English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660

The Long Parliament was an English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660. It followed the fiasco of the Short Parliament which had convened for only three weeks during the spring of 1640, and which in turn had followed an 11-year parliamentary absence. In September 1640, King Charles I issued writs summoning a parliament to convene on 3 November 1640. He intended it to pass financial bills, a step made necessary by the costs of the Bishops' Wars in Scotland. The Long Parliament received its name from the fact that, by Act of Parliament, it stipulated it could be dissolved only with agreement of the members; and, those members did not agree to its dissolution until 16 March 1660, after the English Civil War and near the close of the Interregnum.

Prides Purge Event in second English Civil War

Pride's Purge was an event that took place in December 1648, during the Second English Civil War, when troops of the New Model Army under the command of Colonel Thomas Pride forcibly removed from the Long Parliament all those who were not supporters of the Grandees in the New Model Army and the Independents. Some have called it a coup d'état.

Pury died at the age of 73.

Pury married Barbara Kyrle daughter of James Kyrle of Walford. [1]

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Sir Thomas Trevor, 1st Baronet
Member of Parliament for Monmouth Boroughs
1646–1653
Succeeded by
Not represented in Barebones Parliament
Preceded by
Nathaniel Waterhouse
Member of Parliament for Monmouth Boroughs
1659
Succeeded by
Sir Trevor Williams, 1st Baronet