Thomas Quiddington

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Thomas Quiddington (christened 21 January 1743, Coulsdon, Surrey buried 6 December 1804, Coulsdon) was a noted English cricketer of the mid-18th century who played for Surrey.

Contents

Career

Quiddington was a member of the famous Chertsey Cricket Club. His name has the alternative spelling of Quiddenden. He was primarily a bowler but his pace and style are unknown. He was a long stop fielder and described as a "steady batter". [1]

Quiddington's career probably began in the aftermath of the Seven Years' War and he was certainly active between the 1769 and 1784 seasons. [2] He is first recorded playing for Caterham v Hambledon at Guildford Bason on 31 July and 1 August 1769, a game that Hambledon won by 4 wickets. [3]

His last recorded appearance was for Chertsey v Coulsdon in June 1784. [3]

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References

  1. Ashley Mote, John Nyren's "The Cricketers of my Time", Robson, 1998
  2. "From Lads to Lord's – profile". Archived from the original on 10 October 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2012..
  3. 1 2 H T Waghorn, The Dawn of Cricket, Electric Press, 1906