Thomas Quiddington

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Thomas Quiddington (christened 21 January 1743, Coulsdon, Surrey buried 6 December 1804, Coulsdon) was a noted English cricketer of the mid-18th century who played for Surrey.

Coulsdon area in London

Coulsdon is a town in south London, England.

Surrey County of England

Surrey is a county in South East England which borders Kent to the east, West Sussex to the south, Hampshire to the west, Berkshire to the north-west, and Greater London to the north-east.

Cricket Team sport played with bats and balls

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at the wicket with the bat, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each player. Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground. When ten players have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

Contents

Career

Quiddington was a member of the famous Chertsey Cricket Club. His name has the alternative spelling of Quiddenden. He was primarily a bowler but his pace and style are unknown. He was a long stop fielder and described as a "steady batter". [1]

Chertsey Cricket Club in Surrey is one of the oldest cricket clubs in England, the foundation of the club dating to the 1730s. The club is based in Chertsey and plays in the Surrey Championship.

Quiddington's career probably began in the aftermath of the Seven Years' War and he was certainly active between the 1769 and 1784 seasons. [2] He is first recorded playing for Caterham v Hambledon at Guildford Bason on 31 July and 1 August 1769, a game that Hambledon won by 4 wickets. [3]

Seven Years War Global conflict between 1756 and 1763

The Seven Years' War was a global war fought between 1756 and 1763. It involved every European great power of the time and spanned five continents, affecting Europe, the Americas, West Africa, India, and the Philippines. The conflict split Europe into two coalitions: one was led by the Kingdom of Great Britain and included the Kingdom of Prussia, the Kingdom of Portugal, the Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and other small German states; while the other was led by the Kingdom of France and included the Austrian-led Holy Roman Empire, the Russian Empire, the Kingdom of Spain, Sweden, and the Electorate of Saxony. Meanwhile, in India, some regional polities within the increasingly fragmented Mughal Empire, with the support of the French, tried to crush a British attempt to conquer Bengal.

The 1769 English cricket season was the 26th season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket. Details have survived of 11 eleven-a-side matches between significant teams. It was the last season in which the original London Cricket Club and the Artillery Ground featured prominently.

The 1784 English cricket season was the 13th in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecard of only one first-class match has survived.

His last recorded appearance was for Chertsey v Coulsdon in June 1784. [3]

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References

  1. Ashley Mote, John Nyren's "The Cricketers of my Time", Robson, 1998
  2. "From Lads to Lord's – profile". Archived from the original on 10 October 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2012..
  3. 1 2 H T Waghorn, The Dawn of Cricket, Electric Press, 1906