Thomas R. Hudd

Last updated
Thomas R. Hudd
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Wisconsin's 5th district
In office
March 8, 1886 March 3, 1889
Preceded by Joseph Rankin
Succeeded by George H. Brickner
Personal details
Born(1835-10-01)October 1, 1835
Buffalo, New York
Died June 22, 1896(1896-06-22) (aged 60)
Green Bay, Wisconsin
Political party Democratic

Thomas Richard Hudd (October 1, 1835 – June 22, 1896) was an American lawyer from Wisconsin who represented that state for two terms in the United States House of Representatives, as well as serving in both houses of that state's legislature and holding other public offices.

United States federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Wisconsin A north-central state of the United States of America

Wisconsin is a U.S. state located in the north-central United States, in the Midwest and Great Lakes regions. It is bordered by Minnesota to the west, Iowa to the southwest, Illinois to the south, Lake Michigan to the east, Michigan to the northeast, and Lake Superior to the north. Wisconsin is the 23rd largest state by total area and the 20th most populous. The state capital is Madison, and its largest city is Milwaukee, which is located on the western shore of Lake Michigan. The state is divided into 72 counties.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they comprise the legislature of the United States.

Contents

Background

Hudd was born in Buffalo, New York on October 1, 1835 [1] [2] [3] to immigrants from England: his father Richard Hudd was a painter and decorator from Lacock, and his mother Mary née Harrison was from Barby. [3] After the drowning death of his father in 1841, [3] Hudd moved with his mother to Chicago, Illinois, [1] in 1842 and to Appleton, Wisconsin, in 1853. He attended the common schools and Lawrence University in Appleton. He worked as a "printer boy" in the office of the Appleton Crescent , [1] studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1856, and went into practice in Appleton. [1]

Buffalo, New York City in Western New York

Buffalo is the second largest city in the U.S. state of New York and the largest city in Western New York. As of July 2016, the population was 256,902. The city is the county seat of Erie County and a major gateway for commerce and travel across the Canada–United States border, forming part of the bi-national Buffalo Niagara Region.

Lacock village and civil parish in the county of Wiltshire, England

Lacock is a village and civil parish in the county of Wiltshire, England, about 3 miles (5 km) south of the town of Chippenham. The village is owned almost in its entirety by the National Trust and attracts many visitors by virtue of its unspoiled appearance.

Barby, Northamptonshire village in United Kingdom

Barby is a village and civil parish about 5 miles (8 km) north of Daventry in Northamptonshire, England. The 2011 Census recorded the parish population as 2,336. Barby is located right off the M45 motorway a short spur from the M1 motorway to the A45 Trunk Road.

First public offices

He served as district attorney of Outagamie County in 1856 and 1857. [1] He was first elected to the Wisconsin State Senate in 1861 for a two-year term from the Wisconsin Senate, District 22 (Door, Oconto, Outagamie and Shawanaw [sic] counties) as a Democrat (Democratic incumbent Benjamin Ferguson was not a candidate). He was defeated for re-election in 1863 by Joseph Harris, who was a Republican/Union Party candidate. He was elected to the Wisconsin State Assembly's Outagamie County seat in 1867, succeeding fellow Democrat W. H. P. Bogan, but did not run for re-election, since he was leaving the county. The seat was taken by C. E. McIntosh, another Democrat.

District attorney in the United States, represents the government in the prosecution of criminal offenses

In the United States, a district attorney (DA) is the chief prosecutor for a local government area, typically a county. The exact name of the office varies by state.

Outagamie County, Wisconsin County in the United States

Outagamie is a county in the northeast region of the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 176,695. Its county seat is Appleton.

Wisconsin State Senate

The Wisconsin Senate, the powers of which are modeled after those of the U.S. Senate, is the upper house of the Wisconsin State Legislature, smaller than the Wisconsin State Assembly. Together, they constitute the legislative branch of the state of Wisconsin.

Move to Green Bay

Hudd moved to Green Bay, Wisconsin in 1868 and continued the practice of law there. He served as city attorney of Green Bay in 1873 and 1874, and in 1874 was elected to the Assembly's First Brown County district (the City of Green Bay, and the Towns of Bellevue, Eaton, Green Bay, Humboldt, Preble and Scott) as a "Democratic Reform" candidate (the Reform Party was a short-lived coalition of Democrats, reform and Liberal Republicans, and Grangers formed in 1873 which secured the election of one Governor of Wisconsin [4] and a number of state legislators). Incumbent Morgan L. Martin, a former War Democrat turned independent who aligned himself with the Liberal Republicans in opposing the re-election of Ulysses S. Grant), was not a candidate. Hudd won 1,160 votes to 1,075 for Republican Hosmer Kellog Cowles. [5]

Green Bay, Wisconsin City in Wisconsin, United States

Green Bay is a city in and the county seat of Brown County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin, at the head of Green Bay, a sub-basin of Lake Michigan, at the mouth of the Fox River. It is 581 feet (177 m) above sea level and 112 miles (180 km) north of Milwaukee. The population was 104,057 at the 2010 census. Green Bay is the third-largest city in the state of Wisconsin, after Milwaukee and Madison, and the third-largest city on Lake Michigan's west shore, after Chicago and Milwaukee. Green Bay is home to the National Football League's Green Bay Packers.

Brown County, Wisconsin County in the United States

Brown County is a county in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 248,007, making it the fourth-most populous county in Wisconsin. The county seat is Green Bay. Brown County is part of the Green Bay, WI Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Bellevue, Wisconsin Village in Wisconsin, United States

Bellevue is a village in Brown County, Wisconsin, United States. It was a town until incorporating as a village on February 14, 2003. The population was 14,570 at the 2010 census.

He was elected once more to the Senate, this time to the Second District (Brown, Door and Kewaunee counties) for the 1876-1877 term, as a "Democratic Reform" candidate, winning 4018 votes to 2036 for Republican George Grimmer. In 1877 he was re-elected as a Democrat (the Reform coalition having collapsed by then), with 1874 votes to 1593 for Republican Assemblyman William Fisk and 638 for Greenbacker B. F. Smith. [6] He was not a candidate for re-election in 1879, and was succeeded by Republican Speaker of the Assembly David M. Kelly.

The 2nd District of the Wisconsin Senate is located in Eastern Wisconsin, and is currently composed of parts of Brown, Outagamie, Shawano, and Waupaca Counties. The district does not contain the entirety of, but is adjacent to the Green Bay metro area.

Door County, Wisconsin County in the United States

Door County is a county in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,785. Its county seat is Sturgeon Bay.

Kewaunee County, Wisconsin County in the United States

Kewaunee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 20,574. Its county seat is Kewaunee. The county was created in 1852 and organized in 1859.

Hudd served as a delegate to the 1880 Democratic National Convention, and was elected once more to the Senate in 1881, in a new Second District consisting solely of Brown County. Kelly was not a candidate, and Hudd took back the seat with 2152 votes to 1777 for Republican Assemblyman James Rasmussen. He was re-elected in 1884 for what was now a four-year term, with 3,585 votes to 3,087 for Republican Charles W. Day.

The 1880 Democratic National Convention was held June 22 to 24, 1880, at the Music Hall in Cincinnati, Ohio, and nominated Winfield S. Hancock of Pennsylvania for President and William H. English of Indiana for Vice President in the United States presidential election of 1880.

James Rasmussen was a member of the Wisconsin State Assembly.

Charles West Day was an American lumberman, merchant, farmer, and politician.

Congress and after

On February 23, 1886, Hudd was elected as a Democrat to the Forty-ninth Congress to fill the vacancy for Wisconsin's 5th congressional district caused by the death of Joseph Rankin; Charles Day succeeded him in the Senate seat they had contested. Hudd was reelected to the Fiftieth Congress and served from March 8, 1886, to March 3, 1889. He served as chairman of the Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Interior (Fiftieth Congress).

He did not seek renomination in 1888, and resumed the practice of law. He died of a stroke in Green Bay on June 22, 1896, [1] and was interred in Woodlawn Cemetery. [7]

Sources

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Joseph Rankin
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Wisconsin's 5th congressional district

March 8, 1886 – March 3, 1889
Succeeded by
George H. Brickner

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