Thomas R. Mitchell

Last updated
Thomas Rothmaler Mitchell
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from South Carolina's 3rd district
In office
March 4, 1831 March 3, 1833
Preceded by John Campbell
Succeeded by Thomas Singleton
In office
March 4, 1825 March 3, 1829
Preceded by Robert B. Campbell
Succeeded by John Campbell
In office
March 4, 1821 March 3, 1823
Preceded by James Ervin
Succeeded by Robert B. Campbell
Member of the South Carolina House of Representatives from Georgetown District
In office
November 28, 1814 December 18, 1819
Member of the South Carolina House of Representatives from Horry District
In office
November 29, 1809 December 19, 1809
Personal details
Born May 1783
Georgetown, South Carolina
Died November 2, 1837
Georgetown, South Carolina
Political party Democratic-Republican
Other political
affiliations
Jacksonian
Alma mater Harvard University
Profession lawyer, politician

Thomas Rothmaler Mitchell (May 1783 –November 2, 1837) was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they comprise the legislature of the United States.

South Carolina State of the United States of America

South Carolina is a state in the Southeastern United States and the easternmost of the Deep South. It is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the southwest by Georgia across the Savannah River.

Born in Georgetown, South Carolina, in May 1783, Mitchell graduated from Harvard University in 1802, where he studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1808, and commenced practice in Georgetown, South Carolina.

Georgetown, South Carolina City in South Carolina, United States

Georgetown is the third oldest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina and the county seat of Georgetown County, in the Lowcountry. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 9,163. Located on Winyah Bay at the confluence of the Black, Great Pee Dee, Waccamaw, and Sampit rivers, Georgetown is the second largest seaport in South Carolina, handling over 960,000 tons of materials a year.

Harvard University private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with about 6,700 undergraduate students and about 15,250 post graduate students. Established in 1636 and named for its first benefactor, clergyman John Harvard, Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.

He served as member of the state house of representatives, 1809 and 1814–1819. Mitchell was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Seventeenth Congress (March 4, 1821 – March 3, 1823). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1822 to the Eighteenth Congress. He was then elected as a Jacksonian to the Nineteenth and Twentieth Congresses (March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1828 to the Twenty-first Congress.

South Carolina House of Representatives

The South Carolina House of Representatives is the lower house of the South Carolina General Assembly, the upper house being the South Carolina Senate. It consists of 124 Representatives elected to two year terms at the same time as US Congressional elections.

Democratic-Republican Party Historical American political party

The Democratic-Republican Party was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison around 1792 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party run by Alexander Hamilton, who was Secretary of the Treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration. From 1801 to 1825, the new party controlled the presidency and Congress as well as most states during the First Party System. It began in 1791 as one faction in Congress and included many politicians who had been opposed to the new constitution. They called themselves Republicans after their political philosophy, republicanism. They distrusted the Federalist tendency to centralize and loosely interpret the Constitution, believing these policies were signs of monarchism and anti-republican values. The party splintered in 1824, with the faction loyal to Andrew Jackson coalescing into the Jacksonian movement, the faction led by John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay forming the National Republican Party and some other groups going on to form the Anti-Masonic Party. The National Republicans, Anti-Masons, and other opponents of Andrew Jackson later formed themselves into the Whig Party.

He was reelected as a Jacksonian to the Twenty-second Congress (March 4, 1831– March 3, 1833). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1832 to the Twenty-third Congress.

He died in Georgetown, South Carolina, November 2, 1837.

Related Research Articles

John Reynolds (U.S. politician) American politician

John Reynolds was a United States politician from the state of Illinois. He was one of the original four justices of the Illinois Supreme Court, 1818–1825, a member of the Illinois House of Representatives from 1826–1830, 1846–1848, and 1852–1854, and the 4th Illinois Governor from 1830–1834. He also represented Illinois in the United States House of Representatives, 1834–1837 and 1839–1843.

Thomas H. Hall was a Congressional Representative from North Carolina; born in Prince George County, Virginia, in June 1773; studied medicine and practiced in Tarboro, North Carolina; elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Fifteenth Congress and reelected to the three succeeding Congresses ; unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1824 to the Nineteenth Congress; elected to the Twentieth Congress and reelected as a Jacksonian to the three succeeding Congresses ; chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Treasury, Committee on Public Expenditures ; resumed the practice of medicine and also engaged in agricultural pursuits; member of the State senate in 1836; died in Tarboro, North Carolina, on June 30, 1853; interment in Macnail-Hall Cemetery, near Tarboro, North Carolina.

Samuel Price Carson American politician and farmer

Samuel Price Carson was an American political leader and farmer in both North Carolina and Texas. He served as Congressional Representative from North Carolina. He was born in Pleasant Gardens, North Carolina, and studied under private tutors in Pleasant Gardens; engaged in agricultural pursuits; member of the State senate 1822-1824; elected as a Jacksonian to the Nineteenth and to the three succeeding Congresses ; unsuccessful candidate in 1833 for reelection to the Twenty-third Congress; again elected to the State senate in 1834; delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1835.

Garret D. Wall American politician

Garret Dorset Wall was a military officer and politician from New Jersey.

Joshua Lee was a United States Representative from New York.

James P. Heath was a United States congressman from Maryland.

Francis Baylies American politician

Francis Baylies was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, and brother of congressman William Baylies. His great-grandfather was Thomas Baylies, an ironmaster from Coalbrookdale, England, who immigrated to Boston in 1737.

James Turner was a United States Congressional representative from Maryland.

Nathan Gaither was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

Richard French was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

Amos Lane was a U.S. Representative from Indiana, father of James Henry Lane.

Johnathan McCarty was a U.S. Representative from Indiana.

Hiram Paine Hunt was a U.S. Representative from New York.

William Kennon Sr. American politician

William Kennon Sr. was a U.S. Representative from Ohio, cousin of William Kennon Jr.

John Thomson was a United States Representative from Ohio.

William Haile was a U.S. Representative from Mississippi.

Thomas Davenport was a U.S. Representative from Virginia.

James Rogers was a United States Representative from South Carolina. He was born in what is now Goshen Hill Township, Union County, South Carolina. He completed preparatory studies and was graduated from South Carolina College at Columbia, South Carolina, in 1813. Later, he studied law and was admitted to the bar and began practice in Yorkville, South Carolina.

Jeremiah Bailey was a United States Representative from Maine. He was born in Little Compton, Rhode Island on May 1, 1773. He attended the common schools and graduated from Brown University in 1794. He studied law, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Wiscasset, Maine.

Robert B. Campbell American politician

Robert Blair Campbell was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina, brother of John Campbell, also of South Carolina.

References

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
James Ervin
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 3rd congressional district

1821–1823
Succeeded by
Robert B. Campbell
Preceded by
Robert B. Campbell
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 3rd congressional district

1825–1829
Succeeded by
John Campbell
Preceded by
John Campbell
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 3rd congressional district

1831–1833
Succeeded by
Thomas Singleton

Sources

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.