Thomas R. Mitchell

Last updated

Thomas Rothmaler Mitchell
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from South Carolina's 3rd district
In office
March 4, 1831 March 3, 1833
Preceded by John Campbell
Succeeded by Thomas Singleton
In office
March 4, 1825 March 3, 1829
Preceded by Robert B. Campbell
Succeeded byJohn Campbell
In office
March 4, 1821 March 3, 1823
Preceded by James Ervin
Succeeded byRobert B. Campbell
Member of the South Carolina House of Representatives from Georgetown District
In office
November 28, 1814 December 18, 1819
Member of the South Carolina House of Representatives from Horry District
In office
November 29, 1809 December 19, 1809
Personal details
BornMay 1783 (1783-05)
Georgetown, South Carolina
DiedNovember 2, 1837(1837-11-02) (aged 54)
Georgetown, South Carolina
Political party Democratic-Republican
Other political
affiliations
Jacksonian
Alma mater Harvard University
Profession lawyer, politician

Thomas Rothmaler Mitchell (May 1783 November 2, 1837) was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina.

Born in Georgetown, South Carolina, in May 1783, Mitchell graduated from Harvard University in 1802, where he studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1808, and commenced practice in Georgetown, South Carolina.

He served as member of the state house of representatives, 1809 and 1814–1819. Mitchell was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Seventeenth Congress (March 4, 1821 – March 3, 1823). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1822 to the Eighteenth Congress. He was then elected as a Jacksonian to the Nineteenth and Twentieth Congresses (March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1828 to the Twenty-first Congress.

He was reelected as a Jacksonian to the Twenty-second Congress (March 4, 1831– March 3, 1833). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1832 to the Twenty-third Congress.

He died in Georgetown, South Carolina, November 2, 1837.

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References

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
James Ervin
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 3rd congressional district

1821–1823
Succeeded by
Robert B. Campbell
Preceded by
Robert B. Campbell
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 3rd congressional district

1825–1829
Succeeded by
John Campbell
Preceded by
John Campbell
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 3rd congressional district

1831–1833
Succeeded by
Thomas Singleton

Sources