Thomas R. Olsen

Last updated
Thomas R. Olsen
Thomas R Olsen MajGen.JPEG
Born(1934-06-28)June 28, 1934
Houston, Texas
DiedJanuary 5, 2014(2014-01-05) (aged 79)
Sumter, South Carolina
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Air Force
Rank Major general
Battles/wars Vietnam War
Awards

Thomas R. Olsen (June 28, 1934 January 5, 2014) was a major general in the United States Air Force.

Contents

Biography

Olsen was born in Houston, Texas, in 1934. [1] He died on January 5, 2014, at the age of 79. [2] [3]

Career

Olsen completed Squadron Officer School in 1964, Naval Command and Staff College in 1968, and Air War College in 1975. Olsen, from June 1983 to July 1985 was assigned to Headquarters U.S. Pacific Command, Camp H.M. Smith, Hawaii, as deputy director for operations. He then served as assistant chief of staff for operations, Allied Forces Central Europe, Brunssum, Netherlands. In October 1987 he became chief of staff and deputy commander, 4th Allied Tactical Air Force, Heidelberg, West Germany. His retirement was effective as of November 1, 1991.

Awards he received include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Meritorious Service Medal with two oak leaf clusters, Air Medal with 15 oak leaf clusters, and Air Force Commendation Medal.

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References

  1. "Biographies : MAJOR GENERAL THOMAS R. OLSEN". Archived from the original on 1 August 2012.
  2. http://www.theitem.com/news/local_news/maj-gen-thomas-r-olsen---retired-major-general/article_39648682-f91f-54a4-b5b9-cab8575489c6.html
  3. "Tom Olsen Obituary (1934 - 2014) Naples Daily News". Legacy.com .