Thomas Reap

Last updated
Thomas Reap
T Reap.jpg
Reap at Villanova in 1915
Biographical details
Bornc. 1895
DiedFebruary 9, 1935 (aged 40)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1912–1915 Villanova
Position(s) Tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1917–1920 Villanova
1921–? Dickinson (line)
Head coaching record
Overall9–13–4

Thomas M. Reap (circa 1895 – February 9, 1935) was an American lawyer and college football coach. He served as the head coach at Villanova College—now known as Villanova University—from 1917 to 1920, during which time he compiled a record of 9–13–4.

Reap attended Villanova College (now Villanova University), and from 1912 to 1915, [1] played on the football team as a tackle. [2] According to the 1915 edition of Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide, he was one of "the main factors in Villanova's defense." [2]

In 1917, Reap assumed the head coaching position at his alma mater, a post he held for four seasons. During his tenure, he amassed a 9–13–4 record. [3] In 1921, he enrolled in the law school at Dickinson College, where he also served as the line coach for the football team. [4] [5]

In the late 1920s, he was practicing law in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, [6] and was a "prominent Philadelphia lawyer". [7] Reap died in a Scranton, Pennsylvania hospital while undergoing unspecified treatment on February 9, 1935 at the age of 40. [7] His brother and former Villanova teammate, Jim Reap, served as a Lackawanna County sheriff. [7]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Villanova Wildcats (Independent)(1917–1920)
1917 Villanova 0–3–2
1918 Villanova 3–2
1919 Villanova 5–3–1
1920 Villanova 1–5–1
Villanova:9–13–4
Total:9–13–4

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References

  1. Past Performers 1894–2001 (PDF), Villanova Football, p. 137, Villanova University.
  2. 1 2 Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 1915, p. 241, NCAA Publishing Service, 1915.
  3. Game-by-Game History (PDF), Villanova Football, p. 127, Villanova University.
  4. The Villanovan, p. 34, 1921.
  5. Wilbur J. Gobrecht, The History of Football at Dickinson College, 1885-1969, p. 127, Kerr Print. Co., 1971.
  6. Montgomery County Law Reporter, Volume 43, p. 72, Montgomery Bar Association, 1927.
  7. 1 2 3 FORMER VILLANOVA GRID COACH PASSES AWAY, Reading Eagle, February 10, 1935.