Thomas Reap

Last updated
Thomas Reap

T Reap.jpg

Reap at Villanova in 1915
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born c. 1895
Died February 9, 1935 (aged 40)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1912–1915 Villanova
Position(s) Tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1917–1920 Villanova
1921–? Dickinson (line)
Head coaching record
Overall 9–13–4

Thomas M. Reap (circa 1895 – February 9, 1935) was an American lawyer and college football coach. He served as the head coach at Villanova College—now known as Villanova University—from 1917 to 1920, during which time he compiled a record of 9–13–4.

College football collegiate rules version of American/Canadian football, played by student-athletes of American/Canadian colleges and universities

College football is American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.

Villanova University Catholic university near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Villanova University is a private research university in Radnor Township, Pennsylvania Named after Saint Thomas of Villanova, the school is the oldest Catholic university in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Reap attended Villanova College (now Villanova University), and from 1912 to 1915, [1] played on the football team as a tackle. [2] According to the 1915 edition of Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide, he was one of "the main factors in Villanova's defense." [2]

In 1917, Reap assumed the head coaching position at his alma mater, a post he held for four seasons. During his tenure, he amassed a 9–13–4 record. [3] In 1921, he enrolled in the law school at Dickinson College, where he also served as the line coach for the football team. [4] [5]

Dickinson College university

Dickinson College is a private liberal arts college in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1773 as Carlisle Grammar School, Dickinson was chartered September 9, 1783, six days after the signing of the Treaty of Paris, making it the first college to be founded after the formation of the United States. Dickinson was founded by Benjamin Rush, a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence, and named "John and Mary's College" in honor of John Dickinson, a signer of the Constitution who was later the Governor of Pennsylvania, and his wife Mary Norris Dickinson. They donated much of their extensive personal libraries to the new college.

In the late 1920s, he was practicing law in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, [6] and was a "prominent Philadelphia lawyer". [7] Reap died in a Scranton, Pennsylvania hospital while undergoing unspecified treatment on February 9, 1935 at the age of 40. [7] His brother and former Villanova teammate, Jim Reap, served as a Lackawanna County sheriff. [7]

Montgomery County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Montgomery County, locally also referred to as Montco, is the third-most populous county in the U.S. state of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the 71st most populous in the United States. As of 2017, the census-estimated population of the county was 826,075, representing a 3.3% increase from the 799,884 residents enumerated in the 2010 census. Montgomery County is located adjacent to and northwest of Philadelphia. The county seat is Norristown. Montgomery County is geographically diverse, ranging from farms and open land in the extreme north of the county to densely populated suburban neighborhoods in the southern and central portions of the county.

Philadelphia Largest city in Pennsylvania, United States

Philadelphia, sometimes known colloquially as Philly, is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2017 census-estimated population of 1,580,863. Since 1854, the city has been coterminous with Philadelphia County, the most populous county in Pennsylvania and the urban core of the eighth-largest U.S. metropolitan statistical area, with over 6 million residents as of 2017. Philadelphia is also the economic and cultural anchor of the greater Delaware Valley, located along the lower Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis. The Delaware Valley's population of 7.2 million ranks it as the eighth-largest combined statistical area in the United States.

Scranton, Pennsylvania City in Pennsylvania, United States of America

Scranton is the sixth-largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It is the county seat and largest city of Lackawanna County in Northeastern Pennsylvania's Wyoming Valley and hosts a federal court building for the United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania. With a population of 77,291, it is the largest city in the Scranton–Wilkes-Barre–Hazleton, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of about 570,000. The city is conventionally divided into 7 districts: North Scranton, Southside, Westside, East Scranton, Central City, Minooka, and Green Ridge, though these areas do not have legal status.

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Villanova Wildcats (Independent)(1917–1920)
1917 Villanova 0–3–2
1918 Villanova 3–2
1919 Villanova 5–3–1
1920 Villanova 1–5–1
Villanova: 9–13–4
Total: 9–13–4

Related Research Articles

Punk Berryman American football player and coach

Robert Norman "Punk" Berryman was an American football player and coach. He played as a halfback at Pennsylvania State University and was selected as third-team All-American in 1915, his senior year. Berryman served as the head football coach at Gettysburg College in 1916 and at Lafayette College in 1917. He was subsequently an assistant football coach at the University of Iowa and Dickinson College. Berry served as the head basketball coach at Iowa State University during the 1919–20 season; his team finished the season with an overall record of 6–12, placing seventh in the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association with a conference mark of 2–10. In 1922 and 1923 Berryman was an assistant coach at Colgate University under fellow Penn State alumnus, Dick Harlow. In 1924, he coached the Frankford Yellow Jackets, newly enfranchised to the National Football League (NFL), to a record of 11–2–1, good enough for only a third-place finish. The following season, Berryman coached the Millville Football & Athletic Club. In 1926, he coached the Brooklyn Lions to a record of 3–8 in their only season with the NFL. Berryman was born on May 18, 1892. He attended the Northeast Manual Training School in Philadelphia. He died in May 1966.

Clarence Spears American football player and coach, college athletics administrator

Clarence Wiley "Doc" Spears was an American football player, coach, and doctor. He was an All-American guard at Dartmouth College (1914–1915) and served as the head football coach at Dartmouth (1917–1920), West Virginia University (1921–1924), the University of Minnesota (1925–1929), the University of Oregon (1930–1931), the University of Wisconsin–Madison (1932–1935), the University of Toledo (1936–1942), and University of Maryland, College Park (1943–1944), compiling a career college football record of 148–83–14. Spears was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1955.

Fred K. Nielsen American football player and coach, diplomat, lawyer

Fred Kenelm Nielsen was a Danish-American lawyer, diplomatic official, and college football coach. Nielsen served as the head football coach at the Maryland Agricultural College from 1905 to 1906, the George Washington University from 1907 to 1908, Georgetown University from 1910 to 1911, and the Catholic University of America from 1915 to 1916.

Aubrey Alvin "Aub" Devine was an American football and basketball player, coach, and lawyer. He was the quarterback for the University of Iowa Hawkeyes football team from 1919 to 1921. He was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten Conference player all three years at Iowa and was the consensus All-American quarterback in 1921. Devine served as the head basketball coach at the University of Denver for two seasons, from 1923 to 1925. He later worked as an assistant football coach under Howard Jones at the University of Southern California (USC). Devine was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1973.

Earle Dukes Willey was an American lawyer and politician from Dover, in Kent County, Delaware. He was a member of the Republican Party, who served as U.S. Representative from Delaware.

Paul J. Davis American football, basketball, and baseball coach, college athletics administrator

Paul Jones Davis was an American football and baseball player, coach of football, basketball, and baseball, and college athletic administrator. He served as the head football coach at Dickinson College (1908), Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College—now Oklahoma State University (1909–1914), North Dakota Agricultural College—now North Dakota State University (1915–1917), and the University of North Dakota (1920–1924), compiling a career college football record of 69–57–6. Davis was also the head basketball coach at Oklahoma A&M (1911–1915), North Dakota Agricultural (1915–1918), and North Dakota (1920–1924), tallying a mark of 112–44. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at Oklahoma A&M from 1909 to 1915, amassing a record of 54–40–1.

Ralph Hutchinson American football, basketball, and baseball player and coach, college athletics administrator

Ralph Fielding "Hutch" Hutchinson was an American football, basketball, and baseball player. He served as the head football coach at Dickinson College (1901), the University of Texas at Austin (1903–1905), the University of New Mexico (1911–1916), Washington & Jefferson College (1918), the University of Idaho (1919), and the Idaho Technical Institute (1920–1927), compiling a career college football record of 61–53–6. Hutchinson was also the head basketball coach at New Mexico (1910–1917), Idaho (1919–1920), and Idaho Technical (1926–1927), amassing a career college basketball record of 56–18, and the head baseball coach at Texas from 1904 to 1906 and at New Mexico from 1910 to 1917, tallying a career college baseball mark of 69–44–2.

J. Burton Rix American football player and coach, basketball coach, baseball, college athletics administrator

John Burton Rix was an American football and basketball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Southwestern University (1914–1916), Southern Methodist University (1917–1921), the University of Miami (1929). Rix was also the head basketball coach at the University of Texas at Austin (1911–1912) and at Southern Methodist (1917–1921), tallying a career college basketball mark of 29–37.

Blake Miller (American football) American sports coach

William Blake Miller was an American football player and coach.

Forrest Craver American football player and coach

Forrest Eugene "Cap" Craver was an American college football player and coach and athletic director who helped to pioneer physical education programs at the collegiate level including the introduction of intramural sports.

Francis Arthur "Mother" Dunn, was an American football player as well as head football coach for at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. While coaching at Dickinson he also played professional football for the Canton Bulldogs. After coaching he served as a corporate attorney in the steel industry until he retired in 1969

B. Russell Murphy American football coach, basketball player and coach, track coach, college athletics administrator

Benjamin Russell Murphy was an American athlete, coach, and athletics administrator during the early 20th century. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, he coached at numerous schools in several sports including football, basketball and track. Murphy was the first basketball coach at Johns Hopkins University. He is also one of the few college football coaches to resign during the middle of his first year of coaching at a school.

Walter R. Okeson American football player and coach

Walter Raleigh Okeson was the coach of and played for the first all-professional football team, the 1897 Latrobe Athletic Association club. A few years later he became the eighth head football coach for the Lehigh Mountain Hawks in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, a position he held for the 1900 season. His overall coaching record at Lehigh was 5 wins, 6 losses, and 0 ties. This ranks him 17th at Lehigh in total wins and 15th at Lehigh in winning percentage.

Parke H. Davis American football player and coach

Parke Hill Davis was an American football player, coach, and historian who retroactively named national championship teams in American college football from the 1869 through the 1932 seasons. He also named co-national champions at the conclusion of the 1933 season. Davis' selections are included in the NCAA's official football record books, as the only championship teams chosen on the basis of research.

Herbert Huebel American football player and official

Herbert Henry "Hub" Huebel was an American football player, coach, and official. He played at the halfback and quarterback positions for the University of Michigan in 1911 and 1912.

Eddie Reed College football coach

James Edwin Reed was an American lawyer and college football coach. He served as the head coach at Loyola University of New Orleans in 1926 and again from 1935 to 1936.

William Francis Knox was an American football player and coach and lawyer. He played college football for Yale University and was selected as a first-team All-American halfback in 1906. He was the head coach of the 1907 Yale football team which finished the season with a record of 9–0–1. He later became an attorney and was a founder and member of the Pittsburgh law firm of Moorhead & Knox.

T. E. McDonald was an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Sterling College in Sterling, Kansas for one season, in 1920, compiling a record of 0–7–1." McDonald was an alumnus of the University of Iowa.

1934 Pittsburgh Panthers football team

The 1934 Pittsburgh Panthers football team, coached by Jock Sutherland, represented the University of Pittsburgh in the 1934 college football season. The Panthers finished the regular season with eight wins and a single loss and were considered the champions of the East. According to a 1967 Sports Illustrated article, Parke H. Davis, whose selections from 1869–1933 are recognized as "major" in the official NCAA football records book, named Pitt as one of that season's national champions, along with Minnesota, six months after his death on June 5, 1934. The article contained a "list of college football's mythical champions as selected by every recognized authority since 1924," which has served as the basis of the university's historical national championship claims, with the legendary Davis having been the only major selector for three of them, including the posthumous 1934 pick.

Chalmers Tschappat American football player

John Chalmers Tschappat, Jr., sometimes listed as John Franklin Tschappat, was an American football player. He played at the tackle position for the Dayton Triangles of the American Professional Football Association during the 1921 APFA season, the second regular season of the National Football League.

References

  1. Past Performers 1894–2001 (PDF), Villanova Football, p. 137, Villanova University.
  2. 1 2 Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 1915, p. 241, NCAA Publishing Service, 1915.
  3. Game-by-Game History (PDF), Villanova Football, p. 127, Villanova University.
  4. The Villanovan, p. 34, 1921.
  5. Wilbur J. Gobrecht, The History of Football at Dickinson College, 1885-1969, p. 127, Kerr Print. Co., 1971.
  6. Montgomery County Law Reporter, Volume 43, p. 72, Montgomery Bar Association, 1927.
  7. 1 2 3 FORMER VILLANOVA GRID COACH PASSES AWAY, Reading Eagle, February 10, 1935.