Thomas Regnaudin

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A wooden gorgoneion by Regnaudin, former Hotel des Ambassadeurs de Hollande, rue vieille du Temple, Paris. 1660 Gorgoneion Regnaudin Amelot de Bisseuil.jpg
A wooden gorgoneion by Regnaudin, former Hôtel des Ambassadeurs de Hollande, rue vieille du Temple, Paris. 1660

Thomas Regnaudin (baptised 18 February 1622 – 3 July 1706) was a French sculptor, affiliated with Northern Baroque. Some of Regnaudin's works were placed in the Apollo Gallery of the Louvre. A son of a stonemason, he was a pupil of Anguier. [1]

Baptism Christian rite of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water

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Notes

  1. Victor Lucien Tapié, A. Ross Williamson. The age of grandeur: Baroque art and architecture, 1960


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