Thomas Renny-Tailyour

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Colonel Thomas Francis Bruce Renny-Tailyour CB CSI (8 June 1863 10 June 1937) was a British Army officer and surveyor.

British Army land warfare branch of the British Armed Forces of the United Kingdom

The British Army is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2018, the British Army comprises just over 81,500 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 27,000 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.

Surveying The technique, profession, and science of determining the positions of points and the distances and angles between them

Surveying or land surveying is the technique, profession, art and science of determining the terrestrial or three-dimensional positions of points and the distances and angles between them. A land surveying professional is called a land surveyor. These points are usually on the surface of the Earth, and they are often used to establish maps and boundaries for ownership, locations, such as building corners or the surface location of subsurface features, or other purposes required by government or civil law, such as property sales.

Renny-Tailyour was born in Borrowfield, Forfarshire, the son of an officer of the Bengal Engineers. He was educated at Cheltenham College and the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich and was commissioned into the Royal Engineers in 1883. He served in Burma from 1885 to 1889. In 1888 he joined the Indian Army Survey Department, with which he stayed for the rest of his career. He became Deputy Superintendent in 1891, Assistant Surveyor-General in 1904, and Superintendent in 1910. He served in the Boxer Rebellion in 1901. He was promoted Brevet Colonel in 1906.

Borrowfield is a settlement in Aberdeenshire, Scotland in proximity to Netherley.

Cheltenham College independent school in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England

Cheltenham College is a co-educational independent school, located in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. One of the public schools of the Victorian period, it was opened in July 1841. A Church of England foundation, it is well known for its classical, military and sporting traditions, and currently has approximately 640 pupils.

Royal Military Academy, Woolwich military academy in Woolwich, in south-east London

The Royal Military Academy (RMA) at Woolwich, in south-east London, was a British Army military academy for the training of commissioned officers of the Royal Artillery and Royal Engineers. It later also trained officers of the Royal Corps of Signals and other technical corps. RMA Woolwich was commonly known as "The Shop" because its first building was a converted workshop of the Woolwich Arsenal.

He was appointed Companion of the Order of the Star of India (CSI) in 1911 and Companion of the Order of the Bath (CB) in the 1920 New Year Honours [1] shortly before his retirement.

Footnotes

  1. "No. 31712". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 December 1919. p. 3.

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