Thomas Renwick

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Thomas Renwick (1818 – 28 November 1879) was a member of the New Zealand Legislative Council from 15 October 1863 to 28 November 1879, when he died. [1]

New Zealand Legislative Council Upper House of the Parliament of New Zealand (1841 - 1951)

The Legislative Council of New Zealand existed from 1841 until 1951. When New Zealand became a colony in 1841 the Legislative Council was established as the country's first legislature; it was reconstituted as the upper house of a bicameral legislature when New Zealand became self-governing in 1852.

He was from Nelson.

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References

  1. Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand parliamentary record, 1840-1984 (4 ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. p. 162. OCLC   154283103.