Thomas Rice (1654)

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Thomas Rice (June 30, 1654  1747) was a member of the Great and General Court of Massachusetts representing Marlborough in 1715 and 1716 and was a founder of Westborough, Massachusetts on 18 November 1717, and a selectman for the town in 1718 and 1727.

Marlborough, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts, United States

Marlborough is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 38,499 at the 2010 census. Marlborough became a prosperous industrial town in the 19th century and made the transition to high technology industry in the late 20th century after the construction of the Massachusetts Turnpike.

Westborough, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Westborough is a town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 18,272 at the 2010 Census, in nearly 6,900 households. Incorporated in 1717, the town is governed under the New England open town meeting system, headed by a five-member elected Board of Selectmen whose duties include licensing, appointing various administrative positions, and calling a town meeting of citizens annually or whenever the need arises.

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Personal background

Plaque memorializing the death of one and capture of four Rice boys from a flax field with the inscription, "In the Field South of this Spot August 8, 1704 Indians Killed Nahor and Captured Ashur, Adonijah, Silas and Timothy Rice." Thomas Rice's sons included Ashur and Adonijah. The other children were sons of Thomas Rice's cousin Edmund Rice, residing nearby. The monument is located in Westborough, Massachusetts near Westborough High School at global coordinates 42deg15'57''N71deg37'05''W / 42.265712degN 71.617979degW / 42.265712; -71.617979 . Rice-capture-Westboro.jpg
Plaque memorializing the death of one and capture of four Rice boys from a flax field with the inscription, "In the Field South of this Spot August 8, 1704 Indians Killed Nahor and Captured Ashur, Adonijah, Silas and Timothy Rice." Thomas Rice's sons included Ashur and Adonijah. The other children were sons of Thomas Rice's cousin Edmund Rice, residing nearby. The monument is located in Westborough, Massachusetts near Westborough High School at global coordinates 42°15′57″N71°37′05″W / 42.265712°N 71.617979°W / 42.265712; -71.617979 .

Thomas Rice was born on June 30, 1654 to Thomas Rice and Mary (King) Rice in Sudbury, Massachusetts. [1] He was the grandson of Edmund Rice, a 1638 immigrant from England and founder of Sudbury. Rice married Anna Rice, daughter of Deacon Edward Rice and Agnes Bent, on January 10, 1681 at Marlborough, Massachusetts, and they had 14 children. Rice's brother Jonas was an early resident and founder of Worcester. [2]

Sudbury, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Sudbury is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. At the 2010 census, it had a population of 17,659. The town, located in Boston's MetroWest, has a rich colonial history.

Jonas Rice American judge

Jonas Rice (1672–1753) was the first permanent settler of European descent in Worcester, Massachusetts, and was a founder and prominent citizen of the town. He was elected as a judge to the Court of Common Pleas in Worcester County, Massachusetts and he served until his death.

Worcester, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts, United States

Worcester is a city in, and the county seat of, Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States. Named after Worcester, England, as of the 2010 Census the city's population was 181,045, making it the second most populous city in New England after Boston. Worcester is located approximately 40 miles (64 km) west of Boston, 50 miles (80 km) east of Springfield and 40 miles (64 km) north of Providence. Due to its location in Central Massachusetts, Worcester is known as the "Heart of the Commonwealth", thus, a heart is the official symbol of the city. However, the heart symbol may also have its provenance in lore that the Valentine's Day card, although not invented in the city, was mass-produced and popularized by Esther Howland who resided in Worcester.

Rice was among the first to settle prior to 1675 in the southwestern portion of Marlborough known as Chauncey, the portion of Marlborough that later became Westborough. [3] Rice's home was a fortified garrison house that was used by area settlers for refuge from Indian raids during King Philip's War 1675-1676. [3] During Queen Anne's War in 1704, two of Rice's sons, Adonijah and Ashur, were abducted from a flax field in Marlborough by Mohawk raiders from Canada. [4] He was one of the founding members of the town on 18 November 1717, and one of the original members of the Congregational Church at Westborough begun by Ebenezer Parkman in 1724. [1] He represented the Town of Marlborough in the Great and General Court of Massachusetts, the colonial legislature in Boston in 1715 and 1716. [1] [5] And he served as a selectman in Westborough in the years 1718 and 1727. [6] Thomas Rice died in 1747, with the Boston Gazette claiming he died at age 94. [7]

King Philips War conflict between Native American inhabitants of present-day New England and English colonists

King Philip's War was an armed conflict in 1675–78 between Indian inhabitants of New England and New England colonists and their Indian allies. The war is named for Metacomet, the Wampanoag chief who adopted the name Philip because of the friendly relations between his father Massasoit and the Mayflower Pilgrims. The war continued in the most northern reaches of New England until the signing of the Treaty of Casco Bay in April 1678.

Queen Annes War North American theater of the War of the Spanish Succession

Queen Anne's War (1702–1713) was the second in a series of French and Indian Wars fought in England's Thirteen American Colonies; in Europe, it is viewed as the North American theater of the War of the Spanish Succession. It was fought between France and England for control of the American continent, while the War of the Spanish Succession was primarily fought in Europe. The war also involved numerous American Indian tribes allied with each nation, and Spain was allied with France. It is also known as the Third Indian War or in France as the Second Intercolonial War. It was fought on three fronts:

  1. Spanish Florida and the English Province of Carolina attacked one another, and the English forces engaged the French based at Mobile, Alabama in a proxy war involving allied Indians on both sides. The southern war did not result in significant territorial changes, but it had the effect of nearly wiping out the Indian population of Spanish Florida, including parts of southern Georgia, and destroying the network of Spanish missions in Florida.
  2. The English colonies of New England fought against French and Indian forces based in Acadia and Canada. Quebec City was repeatedly targeted by British expeditions, and the Acadian capital Port Royal was taken in 1710. The French and Wabanaki Confederacy sought to thwart New England expansion into Acadia, whose border New France defined as the Kennebec River in southern Maine. Toward this end, they executed raids against targets in the Province of Massachusetts Bay, most famously the raid on Deerfield in 1704.
  3. English colonists based at St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador disputed control of the island with the French based at Plaisance. Most of the conflict consisted of economically destructive raids on settlements. The French successfully captured St. John's in 1709, but the British quickly reoccupied it after the French abandoned it.
Flax species of plant

Flax, also known as common flax or linseed, is a member of the genus Linum in the family Linaceae. It is a food and fiber crop cultivated in cooler regions of the world. The textiles made from flax are known in the Western countries as linen, and traditionally used for bed sheets, underclothes, and table linen. The oil is known as linseed oil. In addition to referring to the plant itself, the word "flax" may refer to the unspun fibers of the flax plant. The plant species is known only as a cultivated plant, and appears to have been domesticated just once from the wild species Linum bienne, called pale flax.

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Thomas Rice may refer to:

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Edmund Rice (colonist) English immigrant to Massachusetts Bay Colony

Edmund Rice, was an early immigrant to Massachusetts Bay Colony born in Suffolk, England. He lived in Stanstead, Suffolk and Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire before sailing with his family to America. He landed in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in summer or fall of 1638, thought to be first living in the town of Watertown, Massachusetts. Shortly thereafter he was a founder of Sudbury in 1638, and later in life was one of the thirteen petitioners for the founding of Marlborough in 1656. He was a deacon in the Puritan Church, and served in town politics as a selectman and judge. He also served five years as a member of the Great and General Court, the combined colonial legislature and judicial court of Massachusetts.

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Thomas Rice was a Massachusetts state legislator and judge prior to and after the American Revolution. He was a physician, educator and clergyman active in Federalist Party politics serving as a presidential elector in the 1792, 1796 and 1800 elections.

Northborough, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

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Thomas Drury (1668–1723) was a founder of Framingham, Massachusetts in 1700.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Ward, Andrew Henshaw. A genealogical History of the Rice Family: Descendants of Deacon Edmund Rice Boston: C. Benjamin Richardson, Publisher, 1858, 379pp
  2. Rice, F.P. (ed.) 1879. Early Records of the Town of Worcester, Book I, 1722-1739. Worcester Society of Antiquity, Worcester, MA.
  3. 1 2 p. 20 In: DeForest, Heman Packard (1891). The History of Westborough, Massachusetts, Part I. Published by the Town of Westborough. online version
  4. Parkman, Ebenezer. (1769). The Story of the Rice Boys: Captured by the Indians August 8, 1704 , Westborough Historical Society, Westborough, Massachusetts, 1906. 7pp
  5. p. 324 In: Schultz, John A. (1979) Legislators of the Massachusetts General Court 1691-1780: A Biographical Dictionary Northeastern University Press, Boston.
  6. p. 466 In: DeForest, Heman Packard (1891). The History of Westborough, Massachusetts, Part I. Published by the Town of Westborough. online version
  7. The Boston Gazette, Boston, Massachusetts, December 26, 1768.