Thomas Richardson, 2nd Lord Cramond

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Thomas Richardson, 2nd Lord Cramond (19 June 1627 16 May 1674) of Honingham Hall, Norfolk was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1660 to 1674.

Honingham Hall

Honingham Hall was a large country house at Honingham in Norfolk.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Richardson was the son of Sir Thomas Richardson and his wife Elizabeth Hewitt daughter of Sir William Hewitt, of Pishiobury, Hertfordshire. He was a grandson of Thomas Richardson who was a judge and speaker of the House of Commons. His grandfather's second wife Elizabeth Richardson, 1st Lady Cramond was given the title Lord Cramond which was to go to her stepson. Richardson succeeded to the peerage on the death of Lady Cramond in April 1651 as his father died on 12 March 1645. [1]

Thomas Richardson (judge) English politician and judge

Sir Thomas Richardson was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1621 to 1622. He was Speaker of the House of Commons for this parliament. He was later Chief Justice of the Common Pleas and Chief Justice of the King’s Bench.

Elizabeth Richardson, 1st Lady Cramond was an English writer and peeress. She is remembered for her collections of prayers.

Lord Cramond

The title of Lord (of) Cramond was a title in the nobility of Scotland. It was created on 23 February 1628 for Dame Elizabeth Richardson. She was married to Sir Thomas Richardson, the second marriage for both, and had no children together. The remainder for the title was to Sir Thomas's heirs, rather than to her own children from her first marriage. Thus, Lady Cramond's eldest son John Ashburnham was not eligible to succeed his mother.

In 1660, Richardson was elected Member of Parliament for Norfolk in the Convention Parliament. He was re-elected MP for Norfolk in 1661 for the Cavalier Parliament and sat until his death in 1674. [2]

Norfolk was a County constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Members of Parliament. In 1832 the county was divided for parliamentary purposes into two new two member divisions – East Norfolk and West Norfolk.

Convention Parliament (1660)

The Convention Parliament followed the Long Parliament that had finally voted for its own dissolution on 16 March that year. Elected as a "free parliament", i.e. with no oath of allegiance to the Commonwealth or to the monarchy, it was predominantly Royalist in its membership. It assembled for the first time on 25 April 1660.

Cavalier Parliament ruling body of 17th century England

The Cavalier Parliament of England lasted from 8 May 1661 until 24 January 1679. It was the longest English Parliament, enduring for nearly 18 years of the quarter-century reign of Charles II of England. Like its predecessor, the Convention Parliament, it was overwhelmingly Royalist and is also known as the Pensioner Parliament for the many pensions it granted to adherents of the King.

Richardson died at the age of 46.

Richardson married Anne Gurney, daughter of Sir Richard Gurney, 1st Baronet, of Totteridge, Hertfordshire. [2] His son Henry succeeded to the title. The estate of Honingham had already been sold to Richard Baylie (in 1650).

Sir Richard Gurney, 1st Baronet, was an English merchant who was Lord Mayor of London. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

Dr Richard Baylie was twice President of St John's College, Oxford, twice Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University, Archdeacon of Nottingham and Dean of Salisbury.

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References

  1. "Richardson, Thomas (1569-1635)"  . Dictionary of National Biography . London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
  2. 1 2 History of Parliament Online - Richardson, Thomas, 2nd Baron Cramond
Parliament of England
Vacant
Not represented in the restored Rump
Title last held by
Sir Horatio Townshend
Sir William D'Oyly
Member of Parliament for Norfolk
1660 1675
With: Sir Horatio Townshend
Sir Ralph Hare, Bt
Sir John Hobart, Bt
Succeeded by
Sir John Hobart, Bt
Sir Robert Kemp, Bt