Thomas Richardson (Labour politician)

Last updated

Thomas Richardson (6 June 1868 – 22 October 1928) [1] was a Labour Party politician in the United Kingdom who served as Member of Parliament (MP) for Whitehaven, in Cumberland, from 1910 to 1918.

The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom that has been described as an alliance of social democrats, democratic socialists and trade unionists. The party's platform emphasises greater state intervention, social justice and strengthening workers' rights.

United Kingdom Country in Europe

The United Kingdom (UK), officially the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and sometimes referred to as Britain, is a sovereign country located off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east, the English Channel to the south and the Celtic Sea to the south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world. The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain and Ireland. With an area of 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi), the United Kingdom is the 78th-largest sovereign state in the world. It is also the 22nd-most populous country, with an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017.

Whitehaven (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Whitehaven was a constituency centred on the town of Whitehaven in Cumberland, which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Thomas Richardson was the first born of Robert Richardson and his wife Margaret and was named for his grandfather who died shortly before he was born. His father worked as a coal miner and the family had lived at Usworth Colliery. Thomas began working as a coal miner as well. In 1885 his father died in an explosion in the Usworth pit which had claimed forty one other men. At the age of 20 Thomas Richardson married his wife Mary Ellinor Purvis. They had four children. He interest in politics was motivated by his desire to improve conditions for coal miners. [2]

Richardson was an active member of the Independent Labour Party, and its leading member in Whitehaven. His brother William was also active in the party, and later became Treasurer of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain. [3]

Independent Labour Party UK political party

The Independent Labour Party (ILP) was a British political party of the left, established in 1893, when the Liberals appeared reluctant to endorse working-class candidates, representing the interests of the majority. A sitting independent MP and prominent union organiser, Keir Hardie, became its first chairman.

The Miners' Federation of Great Britain (MFGB) was established after a meeting of local mining trade unions in Newport, Wales in 1888. The federation was formed to represent and co-ordinate the affairs of local and regional miners' unions in England, Scotland and Wales whose associations remained largely autonomous. At its peak, the federation represented nearly one million workers. It was reorganised into the National Union of Mineworkers in 1945.

He was elected as Whitehaven's first Labour MP at the December 1910 general election. A Labour candidate had stood unsuccessfully in January 1910 general election, but Richardson was assisted by the absence of a Liberal party candidate. [4]

December 1910 United Kingdom general election

The December 1910 United Kingdom general election was held from 3 to 19 December. It was the last general election to be held over several days and the last to be held prior to the First World War (1914–18).

January 1910 United Kingdom general election

The January 1910 United Kingdom general election was held from 15 January to 10 February 1910. The government called the election in the midst of a constitutional crisis caused by the rejection of the People's Budget by the Conservative-dominated House of Lords, in order to get a mandate to pass the budget.

At the 1918 election, he did not stand again in Whitehaven, but stood in Bosworth in Leicestershire, where he was not elected, winning only 33% of the vote in a two-way contest. [5]

1918 United Kingdom general election

The 1918 United Kingdom general election was called immediately after the Armistice with Germany which ended the First World War, and was held on Saturday, 14 December 1918. The governing coalition, under Prime Minister David Lloyd George, sent letters of endorsement to candidates who supported the coalition government. These were nicknamed ‘Coalition Coupons’, and led to the election being known as the ‘coupon election’. The result was a massive landslide in favour of the coalition, comprising primarily the Conservatives and Coalition Liberals, with massive losses for Liberals who were not endorsed. Nearly all the Liberal MPs without coupons were defeated, although party leader H. H. Asquith managed to return to Parliament in a by-election.

Bosworth (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Bosworth is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 1987 by David Tredinnick of the Conservative Party.

Related Research Articles

Epping (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Epping was a parliamentary constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament from 1885 to 1974. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election. The seat underwent loss of territory at boundary reviews in 1945, 1950 and 1955 and was abolished for the February 1974 general election when it was divided between new seats Chingford, Epping Forest and Harlow.

Liverpool Everton was a borough constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

The Ogmore by-election, 1946 was a parliamentary by-election held on 4 June 1946 for the British House of Commons constituency of Ogmore in Wales.

Robert Richardson was a Labour Party politician in the United Kingdom.

Thomas Wing (politician) British politician

Thomas Edward Wing was a Liberal Party politician in the United Kingdom.

Joseph Sullivan (British politician) British politician

Joseph Sullivan was a Scottish Labour Party politician who served as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1922 to 1924, and from 1926 to 1931.

The Cockermouth by-election, 1906 was a by-election held on 3 August 1906 for the British House of Commons constituency of Cockermouth.

Penry Williams British politician

Penry Williams was a Liberal Party politician in England. He was born in Middlesbrough, the son of Edward Williams, a Cleveland ironmaster. He was a brother of Aneurin Williams MP.

Evan Hayward was a Liberal Party politician in England.

Arthur Acland Allen was a British Liberal Party politician who served as a Member of Parliament (MP) between 1906 and 1918.

John William Wilson British politician

John William Wilson, PC, JP was a British chemical manufacturer and politician who served for 27 years as a member of parliament (MP), initially as Liberal Unionist and then as a Liberal.

Richard Cornthwaite Lambert British politician

Richard Cornthwaite Lambert was a British barrister and Liberal Party politician

Alexander Claude Forster Boulton was a British Liberal Party politician whose career in the House of Commons lasted barely four years.

George Nicholls (British politician) British politician

George Nicholls was a British evangelical pastor, and Liberal-Labour politician who served as the Member of Parliament (MP) for North Northamptonshire from 1906 to 1910.

The Hull by-election, 1907 was a parliamentary by-election held in England for the House of Commons constituency of Hull West on 11 November 1907.

William Johnson (Liberal-Labour politician) English coal miner, trade unionist and Liberal-Labour politician

William Johnson was an English coal miner, trade unionist and Liberal-Labour (Lib-Lab) politician from Warwickshire. He sat in the House of Commons from 1906 to 1918.

Arthur Richardson (politician) British politician

Arthur Richardson was a British merchant and Liberal-Labour politician from Nottingham. He sat in the House of Commons between 1906 and 1918.

The Houghton-le-Spring by-election was a Parliamentary by-election. It returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom, elected by the first past the post voting system.

1913 Wandsworth by-election

The Wandsworth by-election was a Parliamentary by-election. It returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom, elected by the first past the post voting system.

The Howdenshire by-election, 1926 was a parliamentary by-election for the British House of Commons constituency of Howdenshire in Yorkshire on 25 November 1926.

References

  1. "House of Commons constituencies beginning with "W" (part 3)". Leigh Rayment's House of Commons pages. Retrieved 21 April 2009.
  2. "Councillor Thomas Richardson". Washington Class. Retrieved 6 February 2017.
  3. David Howell, British workers and the Independent Labour Party, p.47
  4. Craig, F. W. S. (1989) [1974]. British parliamentary election results 1885–1918 (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 208. ISBN   0-900178-27-2.
  5. Craig, F. W. S. (1983) [1969]. British parliamentary election results 1918–1949 (3rd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 410. ISBN   0-900178-06-X.
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
John Arthur Jackson
Member of Parliament for Whitehaven
Dec. 19101918
Succeeded by
James Augustus Grant
Party political offices
Preceded by
New position
North East Division representative on the Independent Labour Party National Administrative Council
1906–1907
Succeeded by
William Wood