Thomas Ricks

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Thomas Ricks may refer to:

Thomas E. Ricks (Mormon) American Mormon leader

Thomas Edwin Ricks was a prominent Mormon pioneer, a community leader, and a settler of the western United States.

Thomas E. Ricks (journalist) American journalist

Thomas Edwin "Tom" Ricks is an American journalist and author who specializes in the military and national security issues. He is a two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting as part of teams from the Wall Street Journal (2000) and Washington Post (2002). He has reported on military activities in Somalia, Haiti, Korea, Bosnia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Kuwait, Turkey, Afghanistan, and Iraq. He currently writes a blog for Foreign Policy and is a member of the Center for a New American Security, a defense policy think tank.

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Mormons Religious group part of the Latter Day Saint movement

Mormons are a religious and cultural group related to Mormonism, the principal branch of the Latter Day Saint movement of Restorationist Christianity, initiated by Joseph Smith in upstate New York during the 1820s. After Smith's death in 1844, the Mormons followed Brigham Young to what would become the Utah Territory. Today, most Mormons are understood to be members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Some Mormons are also either independent or non-practicing. The center of Mormon cultural influence is in Utah, and North America has more Mormons than any other continent, though the majority of Mormons live outside the United States.

Mormonism religious tradition of Mormons

Mormonism is the predominant religious tradition of the Latter Day Saint movement of Restorationist Christianity started by Joseph Smith in Western New York in the 1820s and 30s. After Smith was killed in 1844, most Mormons followed Brigham Young on his westward journey to the area that became the Utah Territory, calling themselves The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Other sects include Mormon fundamentalism, which seeks to maintain practices and doctrines such as polygamy, and other small independent denominations. The second-largest Latter Day Saint denomination, the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, since 2001 called the Community of Christ, does not describe itself as "Mormon", but follows a Trinitarian Christian restorationist theology, and considers itself Restorationist in terms of Latter Day Saint doctrine.

Linguistics and the Book of Mormon

According to most adherents of the Latter Day Saint movement, the Book of Mormon is a 19th-century translation of a record of ancient inhabitants of the American continent, which was written in a script which the book refers to as "reformed Egyptian". This claim, as well as virtually all claims to historical authenticity of the Book of Mormon, are generally rejected by non-Latter Day Saint historians and scientists. Linguistically based assertions are frequently cited and discussed in the context of the subject of the Book of Mormon, both in favor of and against the book's claimed origins.

Hugh Nibley Religious scholar

Hugh Winder Nibley was an American scholar and Mormon apologist who was a professor at Brigham Young University (BYU) for nearly 50 years. He was a prolific author, and wrote apologetic works supporting the archaeological, linguistic, and historical claims of Joseph Smith. He was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and wrote and lectured on LDS scripture and doctrinal topics, publishing many articles in the LDS Church magazines.

Anti-Mormonism intense dislike or fear of Morminism, hostility or prejudice towards Mormons

Anti-Mormonism is discrimination, persecution, hostility or prejudice directed against the Latter Day Saint movement, particularly The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The term is often used to describe persons or literature that are critical of their adherents, institutions, or beliefs, or physical attacks against specific Saints or the Latter Day Saint movement as a whole.

Genetics and the Book of Mormon disagreement between mainstream scientific consensus about the origin of the ancient American peoples and the claims of their Middle Eastern origin in the Book of Mormon

The Book of Mormon, the founding document of the Latter Day Saint movement and one of the four books of scripture of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is an account of three groups of people. According to the book, two of these groups originated from ancient Israel. There is generally no direct support amongst mainstream historians and archaeologists for the historicity of the Book of Mormon.

<i>Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought</i> quarterly journal of Mormonism and the LDS Movement

Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought is an independent quarterly journal of "Mormon thought" that addresses a wide range of issues on Mormonism and the Latter Day Saint Movement.

The Mormons is a four-hour PBS documentary about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The production originally aired in two-hour segments on April 30 and May 1, 2007. It was produced by Helen Whitney, and was the first joint production of Frontline and American Experience.

Historicity of the Book of Mormon

Many members of the Latter Day Saint movement claim historical authenticity of the Book of Mormon. Most, but not all, Mormons hold the book's connection to ancient American history as an article of their faith. This view finds no acceptance outside of Mormonism. The theory that the Book of Mormon is an ancient American history is not considered scientifically credible by anyone. Mormon apologists have proposed multiple theories to explain apparent inconsistencies with the archaeological, genetic, linguistic and other records.

Oscar A. Kirkham American Mormon leader

Oscar Ammon Kirkham was a general authority in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and one of the seven presidents of Seventy.

The Journal of Book of Mormon Studies is an annual peer-reviewed academic journal covering topics surrounding the Book of Mormon. It is published by the University of Illinois Press on behalf of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship with funding from the Laura F. Willes Center for Book of Mormon Studies.

Stephen David Ricks is a professor of Hebrew at Brigham Young University (BYU) and an author and co-author of several books and articles defending The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and its teachings.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Arizona

As of December 31, 2017, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 428,069 members in 895 congregations in Arizona, with 6 missions and 6 temples.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Utah

As of January 1, 2016, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 2,090,402 members living in Utah in 592 stakes, one district, 5,110 Congregations, and eleven missions. As of January 2019, there are 20 temples operating, under construction, or announced in Utah.

Joel Ricks was a Mormon Pioneer and community leader who helped settled the Salt Lake Valley and Cache Valley, Utah. He was the father of Thomas E. Ricks.

Ricks may refer to:

Mormon pornography is a subgenre of pornography-themed around the Mormon religion. Journalist Isha Aran writes that the genre originated in 2010 with the launch of the gay porn site MormonBoyz.com, which portrays sexual relationships between Elders. The more recent site MormonGirlz.com features both straight and lesbian relationships between Mormon characters. Mormonboyz.com founder Legrand Wolf, which is not his real name, proclaims himself under his false name to have graduated from Brigham Young University (BYU) with a Doctorate Degree, as well as to being an ex-Mormon.