Thomas Rider (MP for Kent)

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Thomas Rider (20 August 1785 – 6 August 1847) [1] was a British Whig [2] politician who held a seat in the House of Commons from 1831 to 1835. He was the eldest son of Ingram Rider of Leeds, Yorkshire and educated at Charterhouse School (1776) and University College, Oxford (1783). [1]

House of Commons of the United Kingdom Lower house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

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Charterhouse School English collegiate independent boarding school

Charterhouse is a boarding school in Godalming, Surrey. Originally founded by Thomas Sutton in 1611 on the site of the old Carthusian monastery in Charterhouse Square, Smithfield, London, it educates over 800 pupils, aged 13 to 18 years, and is one of the original Great Nine English public schools. Today pupils are still referred to as Carthusians, and ex-pupils as Old Carthusians.

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Contents

Offices held

He was appointed High Sheriff of Kent for 1829–30. [1] He was elected at the 1831 general election as a Member of Parliament (MP) for Kent, [2] [3] and held the seat until the constituency was divided under the Reform Act 1832. [1] At the 1832 general election he was returned as an MP for the new Western division of Kent, [2] [4] but at the 1835 election he polled poorly, [5] and withdrew from the election at the end of the first day of polling. [2] At the 1837 general election he contested the Eastern division of Kent, [5] but failed to unseat either of the two sitting Conservative Party MPs. [2]

The High Sheriff is the oldest secular office under the Crown. Formerly the High Sheriff was the principal law enforcement officer in the county but over the centuries most of the responsibilities associated with the post have been transferred elsewhere or are now defunct, so that its functions are now largely ceremonial. The High Sheriff changes every March.

1831 United Kingdom general election

The 1831 United Kingdom general election saw a landslide win by supporters of electoral reform, which was the major election issue. As a result, it was the last unreformed election, as the Parliament which resulted ensured the passage of the Reform Act 1832. Polling was held from 28 April to 1 June 1831. The Whigs won a majority of 136 over the Tories, which was as near to a landslide as the unreformed electoral system could deliver. As the Government obtained a dissolution of Parliament once the new electoral system had been enacted, the resulting Parliament was a short one and there was another election the following year. The election was the first since 1715 to see a victory by a party previously in minority.

Kent was a parliamentary constituency covering the county of Kent in southeast England. It returned two "knights of the shire" to the House of Commons by the bloc vote system from the year 1290. Members were returned to the Parliament of England until the Union with Scotland created the Parliament of Great Britain in 1708, and to the Parliament of the United Kingdom after the union with Ireland in 1801 until the county was divided by the Reform Act 1832.

Death

He died on 6 August 1847, aged 81.

Family

He had married Mary Ann Elizabeth Pinnock, but had no children. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "RIDER, Thomas (1765-1847), of Boughton Monchelsea Place, nr. Maidstone, Kent". History of Parliament. Retrieved 19 June 2013.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 157, 158. ISBN   0-900178-13-2.
  3. "No. 18805". The London Gazette . 20 May 1831. p. 972.
  4. "No. 19009". The London Gazette . 1 January 1833. p. 4.
  5. 1 2 Craig, F. W. S. (1989) [1977]. British parliamentary election results 1832–1885 (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 403, 406. ISBN   0-900178-26-4.
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Sir Edward Knatchbull, 9th Bt
Thomas Law Hodges
Member of Parliament for Kent
18311832
With: Thomas Law Hodges
Constituency divided
New constituency Member of Parliament for West Kent
18321835
With: Thomas Law Hodges
Succeeded by
Sir William Geary, Bt
Thomas Law Hodges