Thomas Ridge (cricketer)

Last updated

Thomas Ridge (c. 1737 3 February 1801, Kimpston, Hampshire) was a prominent member of the Hambledon Club and played in a number of its cricket matches, including 6 known first-class appearances for Hampshire between 1768 and 1775. [1]

Hampshire County of England

Hampshire is a county on the southern coast of England. The county town, with city status, is Winchester, a frequent seat of the Royal Court before any fixed capital, in late Anglo-Saxon England. After the metropolitan counties and Greater London, Hampshire is the most populous ceremonial county in the United Kingdom. Its two largest settlements, Southampton and Portsmouth, are administered separately as unitary authorities and the rest of the area forms the administrative county, which is governed by Hampshire County Council.

The Hambledon Club was a social club that is famous for its organisation of 18th century cricket matches. By the late 1770s it was the foremost cricket club in England.

Cricket Team sport played with bats and balls

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at the wicket with the bat, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each player. Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground. When ten players have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

Ridge, a country squire, was well known in hunting circles and established a hunt at Kilmiston, Hampshire, in 1780. [2]

Fox hunting dog sport, hunting

Fox hunting is an activity involving the tracking, chase and, if caught, the killing of a fox, traditionally a red fox, by trained foxhounds or other scent hounds, and a group of unarmed followers led by a "master of foxhounds", who follow the hounds on foot or on horseback.

Related Research Articles

Hambledon, Hampshire village and civil parish in the county of Hampshire in England

Hambledon is a small village and civil parish in the county of Hampshire in England, situated about 15 miles (24 km) north of Portsmouth.

Hampshire County Cricket Club English domestic cricket team

Hampshire County Cricket Club is one of eighteen first-class county clubs within the domestic cricket structure of England and Wales. It represents the historic county of Hampshire. Hampshire teams formed by earlier organisations, principally the Hambledon Club, always had first-class status and the same applied to the county club when it was founded in 1863. Because of poor performances for several seasons until 1885, Hampshire then lost its status for nine seasons until it was invited into the County Championship in 1895, since when the team have played in every top-level domestic cricket competition in England. Hampshire originally played at the Antelope Ground, Southampton until 1885 when they relocated to the County Ground, Southampton until 2000, before moving to the purpose-built Rose Bowl in West End, which is in the Borough of Eastleigh. The club has twice won the County Championship, in the 1961 and 1973 seasons.

Broadhalfpenny Down historic cricket ground in Hambledon, Hampshire

Broadhalfpenny Down is a historic cricket ground in Hambledon, Hampshire. It is known as the "Cradle of Cricket" because it was the home venue in the 18th century of the Hambledon Club, but cricket predated the club and ground by at least two centuries. The club is in the parish of Hambledon close to the neighbouring parish of Clanfield. The club took the name of the neighbouring rural village of Hambledon, situated about 2.7 away miles by road.

The 1772 English cricket season was the 29th season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket and the first in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. Details have survived of three first-class matches, all featuring Hampshire sides playing England XIs.

The 1766 English cricket season was the 23rd season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket. Details have survived of three eleven-a-side matches between significant teams.

The 1733 English cricket season was the 37th cricket season since the earliest recorded eleven-aside match was played. Details have survived of 12 matches. Two local matches played in Hampshire are the earliest known to have been played in the county.

Hampshire county cricket teams have been traced back to the 18th century but the county's involvement in cricket goes back much further than that. Given that the first definite mention of cricket anywhere in the world is dated c.1550 in Guildford, in neighbouring Surrey, it is almost certain that the game had reached Hampshire by the 16th century.

The 1764 English cricket season was the 21st season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket. Details have survived of seven eleven-a-side matches between significant teams.

The 1773 English cricket season was the second in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of eight first-class matches have survived.

The 1774 English cricket season was the third in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of five first-class matches have survived.

The 1775 English cricket season was the fourth in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of four first-class matches have survived.

The 1776 English cricket season was the fifth in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of seven first-class matches have survived. The earliest printed cricket scorecard templates were introduced during 1776.

The 1777 English cricket season was the sixth in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of six first-class matches have survived. James Aylward made a record score of 167 runs that stood until 1820.

The 1778 English cricket season was the seventh in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of five first-class matches have survived.

The 1779 English cricket season was the eight in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of five first-class matches have survived.

1788 was the second season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). On Friday, 30 May, MCC published a revised code of the Laws of Cricket, calling themselves the "Cricket Club at Marylebone". This action confirmed MCC as the body both in sole charge of the Laws and responsible for the sport's governance. Four weeks later, MCC and its predecessor White Conduit Club played each other at Lord's Old Ground in the earliest match featuring MCC to leave a surviving scorecard.

1792 was the sixth season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). Kent played Hampshire at Cobham Park, which was Lord Darnley’s estate and the home of the Bligh family. Ninety years later it became the home of the Ashes in the shape of the urn brought back from Australia by the Hon. Ivo Bligh.

1819 was the 33rd season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). The Gentlemen v Players match, previously played in 1806 only, was resurrected.

Rose Bowl (cricket ground)

The Rose Bowl, currently known as The Ageas Bowl for sponsorship reasons, is a cricket ground and residential hotel complex in West End, Hampshire, England, located between the M27 motorway and Telegraph Woods. It is the home of Hampshire County Cricket Club, who have played there since 2001.

References

  1. CricketArchive
  2. David Underdown, Start of Play, Allen Lane, 2000