Thomas Rippon (cashier)

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Thomas Rippon by an unknown artist, Bank of England Museum, London. Thomas Rippon.jpg
Thomas Rippon by an unknown artist, Bank of England Museum, London.

Thomas Rippon (1760–1835) was the Chief Cashier of the Bank of England from 1829 to 1835. Rippon was replaced as Chief Cashier by Matthew Marshall. [2]

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References

  1. "Thomas Rippon (1760–1835), Chief Cashier of the Bank of England (1829–1835)". Art UK. Retrieved 2021-01-19.
  2. Chief Cashiers. Bank of England. Retrieved 21 September 2014.