Thomas Robertson (Australian politician)

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Thomas Robertson (1830 1 October 1891) was an English-born Australian politician.

He was born at Windsor in Berkshire to Thomas Robertson, who taught mathematics at Eton College, and Isabella Stevenson. He migrated to New South Wales, becoming a squatter in the Clarence River area. He subsequently qualified as a solicitor and in 1863 settled at Deniliquin, where he was alderman and mayor. On 26 February 1857 he married Jane Susannah Cunningham, with whom he had twelve children. In 1873 he was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly for Hume, but he was defeated in 1874. Robertson died at Hay in 1891. [1]

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References

  1. "Mr Thomas Robertson (1830-1891)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 23 June 2019.

 

New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
James McLaurin
Member for Hume
1873–1874
Succeeded by
George Day