Thomas Robinson, 1st Baron Grantham

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The Lord Grantham

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Thomas Robinson, 1st Baron Grantham.jpg
Leader of the House of Commons
In office
23 March 1754 October 1755
Preceded by Henry Pelham
Succeeded by Henry Fox
Secretary of State for the Southern Department
In office
23 March 1754 October 1755
Preceded by The Earl of Holderness
Succeeded by Henry Fox
Personal details
Born1695
Grantham, England
Died30 September 1770 (aged 74/75)
Cause of deathStroke
Political party Conservative
Spouse(s)Frances Worsley
Children8
Alma mater Trinity College, Cambridge

Thomas Robinson, 1st Baron Grantham, KB , PC (ca. 1695 – 30 September 1770), of Newby, Yorkshire, was a British diplomat and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1727 and 1761.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom Formal body of advisers to the sovereign in the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or just the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

Kingdom of Great Britain Constitutional monarchy in Western Europe between 1707 and 1801

The Kingdom of Great Britain, officially called simply Great Britain, was a sovereign state in western Europe from 1 May 1707 to 31 December 1800. The state came into being following the Treaty of Union in 1706, ratified by the Acts of Union 1707, which united the kingdoms of England and Scotland to form a single kingdom encompassing the whole island of Great Britain and its outlying islands, with the exception of the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. The unitary state was governed by a single parliament and government that was based in Westminster. The former kingdoms had been in personal union since James VI of Scotland became King of England and King of Ireland in 1603 following the death of Elizabeth I, bringing about the "Union of the Crowns". After the accession of George I to the throne of Great Britain in 1714, the kingdom was in a personal union with the Electorate of Hanover.

Contents

Early life

Robinson was a younger son of Sir William Robinson, Bt (1655–1736) of Newby-on-Swale, Yorkshire, who was Member of Parliament for York from 1697 to 1722. His elder brother was Rear Admiral Sir Tancred Robinson. Having been a scholar and minor fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, [1]

Sir William Robinson, 1st Baronet English Member of Parliament and Lord Mayor of York

Sir William Robinson, 1st Baronet, 1st Baronet of Newby-on-Swale, Yorkshire, was an English Member of Parliament and Lord Mayor of York.

Sir Tancred Robinson, 3rd Baronet British Rear Admiral and Mayor of York

Sir Tancred Robinson, 3rd Baronet was an English Rear admiral and Lord Mayor of York.

Trinity College, Cambridge constituent college of the University of Cambridge in England

Trinity College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in England. With around 600 undergraduates, 300 graduates, and over 180 fellows, it is the largest college in either of the Oxbridge universities by number of undergraduates. In terms of total student numbers, it is second only to Homerton College, Cambridge.

Career

Robinson gained his earliest diplomatic experience in Paris, At the 1727 British general election he was returned as Member of Parliament for Thirsk on the Frankland interest, after his eldest brother, for whom the seat had originally been intended, resigned his pretensions to him. He was absent, presumably on account of his diplomatic duties, from all the recorded divisions of that Parliament. [2] After Paris, he went to Vienna, where he was English ambassador from 1730 to 1748. During 1741 he sought to make peace between the empress Maria Theresa and Frederick the Great, but in vain, and in 1748 he represented his country at the Congress of Aix-la-Chapelle. He was made a Knight Companion of the Bath in 1742.

Paris Capital city of France

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of 105 square kilometres and an official estimated population of 2,140,526 residents as of 1 January 2019. Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, diplomacy, commerce, fashion, science, as well as the arts. The City of Paris is the centre and seat of government of the Île-de-France, or Paris Region, which has an estimated official 2019 population of 12,213,364, or about 18 percent of the population of France. The Paris Region had a GDP of €709 billion in 2017. According to the Economist Intelligence Unit Worldwide Cost of Living Survey in 2018, Paris was the second most expensive city in the world, after Singapore, and ahead of Zurich, Hong Kong, Oslo and Geneva. Another source ranked Paris as most expensive, on a par with Singapore and Hong Kong, in 2018. The city is a major railway, highway, and air-transport hub served by two international airports: Paris-Charles de Gaulle and Paris-Orly. Opened in 1900, the city's subway system, the Paris Métro, serves 5.23 million passengers daily, and is the second busiest metro system in Europe after Moscow Metro. Gare du Nord is the 24th busiest railway station in the world, but the first located outside Japan, with 262 million passengers in 2015.

1727 British general election

The 1727 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 7th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The election was triggered by the death of King George I; at the time, it was the convention to hold new elections following the succession of a new monarch. The Tories, led in the House of Commons by William Wyndham, and under the direction of Bolingbroke, who had returned to the country in 1723 after being pardoned for his role in the Jacobite rising of 1715, lost further ground to the Whigs, rendering them ineffectual and largely irrelevant to practical politics. A group known as the Patriot Whigs, led by William Pulteney, who were disenchanted with Walpole's government and believed he was betraying Whig principles, had been formed prior to the election. Bolingbroke and Pulteney had not expected the next election to occur until 1729, and were consequently caught unprepared and failed to make any gains against the government party.

Thirsk was a parliamentary borough in Yorkshire, represented in the English and later British House of Commons in 1295, and again from 1547. It was represented by two Members of Parliament until 1832, and by one member from 1832 to 1885, when the constituency was abolished and absorbed into the new Thirsk and Malton division of the North Riding of Yorkshire.

Returning to England Robinson sat in parliament for Christchurch from 1749 to 1761. In 1750, he was appointed to the Privy Council. [2]

Christchurch, Dorset Town in England

Christchurch is a town, civil parish and former borough now in the Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole district, on the south coast of England. The town adjoins Bournemouth in the west and the New Forest lies to the east. Historically in the county of Hampshire, it became part of the administrative county of Dorset in the 1974 reorganisation of local government. Covering an area of 19.5 square miles (51 km2), Christchurch had a 2013 population of 48,368, making it the fourth-most populous town in Dorset, close behind Weymouth which has a population of 54,539.

Southern Secretary

Caricature of George Bubb Dodington and Sir Thomas Robinson Paul Sandby - Caricature of George Bubb Dodington and Sir Thomas Robinson - Google Art Project.jpg
Caricature of George Bubb Dodington and Sir Thomas Robinson

In 1754 Robinson was appointed Secretary of State for the Southern Department and Leader of the House of Commons by the prime minister, the Duke of Newcastle, and it was on this occasion that Pitt made the famous remark to Fox, "the duke might as well have sent us his jackboot to lead us." In November 1755 he resigned, and in April 1761 he was created Baron Grantham.

Secretary of State for the Southern Department position in the cabinet of the government of Kingdom of Great Britain up to 1782

The Secretary of State for the Southern Department was a position in the cabinet of the government of Kingdom of Great Britain up to 1782, when the Southern Department became the Foreign Office.

Leader of the House of Commons responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons

The Leader of the House of Commons is generally a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons.

Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle Prime Minister of Great Britain

Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle upon Tyne and 1st Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyme, was a British Whig statesman, whose official life extended throughout the Whig supremacy of the 18th century. He is commonly known as the Duke of Newcastle.

Later career

He was Master of the Great Wardrobe 1749–1754 and again 1755–1760, and was joint Postmaster-General in 1765 and 1766. He died in London on 30 September 1770.

He married Frances, daughter of Thomas Worsley of Hovingham, on 13 July 1737, and had two sons and six daughters. He was succeeded in the peerage by his eldest son, Thomas.

The town of Grantham, New Hampshire in the United States of America is named after Robinson.

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References

  1. "Robinson, Thomas (RBN712T)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. 1 2 "ROBINSON, Thomas (1695-1770), of Newby, Yorks". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 28 April 2019.

"Robinson, Thomas (1695-1770)"  . Dictionary of National Biography . 1885–1900.

Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Sir Thomas Frankland
William St. Quinton
Member of Parliament for Thirsk
17271734
With: Sir Thomas Frankland
Succeeded by
Sir Thomas Frankland
Frederick Meinhardt Frankland
Preceded by
Edward Hooper
Charles Armand Powlett
Member of Parliament for Christchurch
1748–1761
With: Charles Armand Powlett 1748–1751
Lord Harry Powlett 1751–1754
Hon. John Mordaunt 1754–1761
Succeeded by
Hon. Thomas Robinson
James Harris
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
The Earl Waldegrave
British Ambassador to Austria
1730–1748
Succeeded by
Robert Keith
Court offices
Preceded by
The Duke of Montagu
Master of the Great Wardrobe
1749–1754
Succeeded by
The Viscount Barrington
Preceded by
The Viscount Barrington
Master of the Great Wardrobe
1755–1760
Succeeded by
The Earl Gower
Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Holdernesse
Secretary of State for the Southern Department
1754–1755
Succeeded by
Henry Fox
Preceded by
Sir Henry Pelham
Leader of the House of Commons
1754–1755
Preceded by
The Lord Trevor
The Lord Hyde
Postmaster-General
1765–1766
With: The Earl of Bessborough
Succeeded by
Viscount Hillsborough
The Lord le Despencer
Peerage of Great Britain
New creation Baron Grantham
1761–1770
Succeeded by
Thomas Robinson