Thomas Robinson, 2nd Baron Grantham

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The Lord Grantham

PC
Thomas Robinson 2nd Baron.jpg
First Lord of Trade
In office
9 December 1780 11 July 1782
Monarch George III
Prime Minister Lord North
The Marquess of Rockingham
Preceded by The Earl of Carlisle
Succeeded by The Lord Sydney (President of the Committee on Trade and Foreign Plantations)
Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
In office
13 July 1782 2 April 1783
Monarch George III
Prime Minister The Earl of Shelburne
Preceded by Charles James Fox
Succeeded byCharles James Fox
Personal details
Born30 November 1738 (1738-11-30)
Vienna, Austria
Died20 July 1786 (1786-07-21) (aged 47)
Nationality British
Political party Whig
Spouse(s) Lady Mary Yorke
(1757–1830)
Alma mater Christ's College, Cambridge

Thomas Robinson, 2nd Baron Grantham PC (30 November 1738 – 20 July 1786) was a British statesman. He notably served as Foreign Secretary between 1782 and 1783.

Contents

Background and education

Grantham was born in Vienna, Austria, the son of Thomas Robinson, 1st Baron Grantham, British Ambassador to Austria at the time, by his wife Frances, daughter of Thomas Worsley. He was educated at Westminster School and at Christ's College, Cambridge, [1]

Political career

Grantham entered parliament as member for Christchurch in 1761, [2] and succeeded to the peerage, because of his father's death, in 1770. That year he was appointed to the Privy Council. In 1771 he was sent as British Ambassador to Spain and retained this post until war broke out between Great Britain and Spain in 1779. In 1772, while at the Summer Spanish Court in Aranjuez, he received correspondence from Richard Wall, the Spanish Minister of Foreign Affairs. [3] From 1780 to 1782 Grantham was President of the Board of Trade, and from July 1782 to April 1783 Foreign Secretary under Lord Shelburne.

Marriage and progeny

James Grant of Grant, John Mytton, the Hon. Thomas Robinson, and Thomas Wynne by Nathaniel Dance-Holland, c. 1760. Nathaniel Dance-Holland - James Grant of Grant, John Mytton, the Hon. Thomas Robinson, and Thomas Wynne - Google Art Project.jpg
James Grant of Grant, John Mytton, the Hon. Thomas Robinson, and Thomas Wynne by Nathaniel Dance-Holland, c. 1760.

In 1780 Lord Grantham married Lady Mary Jemima Yorke (1757-1830), younger daughter of Philip Yorke, 2nd Earl of Hardwicke by his wife Lady Jemima Campbell (1723-1797), suo jure 2nd Marchioness Grey, a daughter of John Campbell, 3rd Earl of Breadalbane and Holland and Lady Amabel Grey, a daughter of Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Kent (1671-1740).

In 1740 Lord Grantham's mother-in-law Lady Jemima Campbell (1723-1797) succeeded as Marchioness Grey by a special remainder upon the death of her maternal grandfather Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Kent, who also held that title. As she had no male heirs, the title later became extinct upon her own death in 1797, but in 1816 her elder daughter Lady Amabel Yorke (1750–1833) (wife of Alexander Hume-Campbell, Lord Polwarth) was created Countess de Grey in her own right.

Lord Grantham and his wife lived at Grantham House in Whitehall Yard, Westminster. By his wife had two sons:

Death

He died on 20 July 1786, aged only 46, and was succeeded in the barony by his eldest son, Thomas de Grey, 2nd Earl de Grey. His widow continued to live at Grantham House until her own death in January 1830, aged 72 years. [4]

See also

Wrest Park

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References

  1. "Robinson, Thomas (RBN755T)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "C" (part 4)
  3. Letters from Wall to Robinson, 30 December 1772, 10 December 1776, 13 December 1774, 18 October 1777. Bedfordshire and Luton Archives and Record Service L 30/14/409/1-4. Wall lived at Soto de Roma, Íllora, near Granada and mentions people from England visiting him, receiving and sending little presents.
  4. "Grantham House". British History Online. Retrieved 6 March 2018.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Sir Thomas Robinson
John Mordaunt
Member of Parliament for Christchurch
1761–1770
With: James Harris
Succeeded by
James Harris
Sir James Harris
Political offices
Preceded by
Viscount Villiers
Vice-Chamberlain of the Household
1770–1771
Succeeded by
Viscount Hinchingbrooke
Preceded by
The Earl of Carlisle
First Lord of Trade
1780–1782
Succeeded by
Thomas Townshend
as President of the Committee on
Trade and Foreign Plantations
Preceded by
Charles James Fox
Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
1782–1783
Succeeded by
Charles James Fox
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Thomas Robinson
Baron Grantham
1770–1786
Succeeded by
Thomas Robinson