Thomas Rock

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Thomas Rock ( 75°42′S158°36′E / 75.700°S 158.600°E / -75.700; 158.600 Coordinates: 75°42′S158°36′E / 75.700°S 158.600°E / -75.700; 158.600 ) is a small nunatak lying 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) northeast of Tent Rock and 6 nautical miles (11 km) west of Ricker Hills in the Prince Albert Mountains, Victoria Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos 1956-62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Kenneth E. Thomas, radioman with the winter party at South Pole Station, 1966.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Nunatak Exposed, often rocky element of a ridge, mountain, or peak not covered with ice or snow within an ice field or glacier

A nunatak is an exposed, often rocky element of a ridge, mountain, or peak not covered with ice or snow within an ice field or glacier. They are also called glacial islands. Examples are natural pyramidal peaks. When rounded by glacial action, smaller rock promontories may be referred to as rognons.

Tent Rock is a small nunatak shaped like a ridge tent, lying 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) southwest of Thomas Rock and 7 nautical miles (13 km) west of Ricker Hills in the Prince Albert Mountains, Oates Land. Mapped and descriptively named by the Southern Party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1962-63.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thomas Rock" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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