Thomas Roderick Dew

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Dew characterized women as modest, passive, virtuous, and religiously devout, attributing these traits to women's physical weakness, which rendered them dependent on male goodwill. He also asserted that men, across all cultures and historical periods, were intellectually superior to women, but he blamed the disparity on differences in the substance and duration of education rather than on unequal natural endowments. Dew argued that it was appropriate to deny suffrage to women because their intense focus on their own families impeded their ability to comprehend broader political developments. [3]

He described the hardships faced by men in the marketplace and the almost brutal strength needed to survive in such a competitive atmosphere. He stated that courage and boldness are man's attributes. For Dew, women were dependent and weak, but a spring of irresistible power.

Works by Thomas R. Dew

Briefer pieces, letters, speeches

Archival material

Dew's family papers [12] and papers from his time as president of the College of William and Mary [13] can be found at the Special Collections Research Center at the College of William and Mary.

Media

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Ely, Melvin Patrick; Loux, Jennifer R. "Thomas R. Dew (1802–1846)". Encyclopedia Virginia/Dictionary of Virginia Biography. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 9 March 2015.
  2. 1 2 Brophy, Alfred L. (2008). "Considering William and Mary's History with Slavery: The Case of President Thomas R. Dew" (PDF). William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal. 16: 1091–1139. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 9, 2014. Retrieved November 22, 2018.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Ely, Melvin Patrick; Loux, Jennifer R.; Dictionary of Virginia Biography (2015). "Thomas R. Dew (1802–1846)". Encyclopedia Virginia. Virginia Humanities in partnership with the Library of Virginia.
  4. Swem Library Special Collections Research Center Archives. "Papers, ca. 1830-1967". Archived from the original on July 20, 2021. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  5. Pitts, Leonard (September 2, 2016). "A white Southerner searches for the source of his family's racism". Washington Post . Archived from the original on November 25, 2018. Retrieved June 10, 2018.
  6. Nuttall, P. Austin (1840). A classical and archaeological dictionary of the manners, customs, laws, institutions, arts, etc. of the celebrated nations of antiquity, and of the middle ages. To which is prefixed A synoptical and chronological view of ancient history. London: Whittaker. OCLC   2667864.
  7. Brophy, Alfred L. (2016). University, Court, and Slave: Prolsavery Thought in Southern Courts and Colleges and the Coming of Civil War. Oxford University Press. ISBN   978-0190625931.
  8. Brophy, Alfred L. (June 2013). "The Nat Turner Trials". North Carolina Law Review . 91: 1817–80. SSRN   2281519.
  9. Harrison, Jesse Burton (1832). Review of the slave question : extracted from the American Quarterly Review, Dec. 1832, based on the speech of Th. Marshall, of Fauquier, showing that slavery is the essential hindrance to the prosperity of the slave-holding states : with particular reference to Virginia, though applicable to other states where slavery exists. By a Virginian. American Quarterly Review. Richmond, Printed by T.W. White.
  10. Harper, William; Hammond, James Henry; Dew, Thomas Roderick; Simms, William Gilmore (1853). The Pro-Slavery Argument. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Grambo, & Co. Archived from the original on 2014-07-07. Retrieved 2016-04-14.
  11. Brophy, Alfred L. (2008). "Considering William and Mary's History with Slavery: The Case of President Thomas Roderick Dew" (PDF). William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal. Vol. 16. pp. 1091–1139. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2020-07-09. Retrieved 2018-12-12.
  12. "Dew Family Papers". Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary. Archived from the original on 27 June 2010. Retrieved 25 January 2011.
  13. "Office of the President. Thomas Roderick Dew". Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary. Archived from the original on 26 June 2010. Retrieved 25 January 2011.

Further reading

Thomas Roderick Dew
Thomas Roderick Dew.jpg
13th President of the
College of William & Mary
In office
1836–1846