Thomas Rolph (cricketer)

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Thomas Lawford Rolph (13 February 1840 – 5 September 1876) was a Canadian-born lawyer and a cricketer who played in a single first-class cricket match for Cambridge University in 1860. [1] He was born in Dundas County, Ontario, Canada, and died at Gloucester in England.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Canada's southern border with the United States is the world's longest bi-national land border. Its capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. As a whole, Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land area being dominated by forest and tundra. Consequently, its population is highly urbanized, with over 80 percent of its inhabitants concentrated in large and medium-sized cities, many near the southern border. Canada's climate varies widely across its vast area, ranging from arctic weather in the north, to hot summers in the southern regions, with four distinct seasons.

First-class cricket is an official classification of the highest-standard international or domestic matches in the sport of cricket. A first-class match is of three or more days' scheduled duration between two sides of eleven players each and is officially adjudged to be worthy of the status by virtue of the standard of the competing teams. Matches must allow for the teams to play two innings each although, in practice, a team might play only one innings or none at all.

Cambridge University Cricket Club cricket team

Cambridge University Cricket Club, first recorded in 1817, is the representative cricket club for students of the University of Cambridge. Depending on the circumstances of each individual match, the club has always been recognised as holding first-class status. The university played List A cricket in 1972 and 1974 only. It has not played top-level Twenty20 cricket.

The elder son of the Canadian politician George Rolph, Thomas Rolph was educated in England at Cheltenham College and at Trinity Hall, Cambridge. [2] He played cricket as a middle-order batsman for his school, but when selected for a single match for Cambridge University against the Cambridge Town Club he failed to score in either innings and was not picked again. [3] He played a few minor cricket matches for amateur sides both during his time at Cambridge and afterwards, but played no more first-class cricket. [1]

George Rolph was a lawyer and political figure in Upper Canada.

Cheltenham College independent school in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England

Cheltenham College is a co-educational independent school, located in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. One of the public schools of the Victorian period, it was opened in July 1841. A Church of England foundation, it is well known for its classical, military and sporting traditions, and currently has approximately 640 pupils.

Trinity Hall, Cambridge College of the University of Cambridge

Trinity Hall is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. It is the fifth-oldest college of the university, having been founded in 1350 by William Bateman, Bishop of Norwich.

Rolph graduated from Cambridge University in 1863 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. [2] He became a solicitor and was part of the London firm of Renshaw and Rolph, with offices in Cannon Street. [2]

A Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate Bachelor of Arts with Honors degree in some countries.

Cannon Street street in the City of London

Cannon Street is a road in the City of London, the historic nucleus of London and its modern financial centre. It runs roughly parallel with the River Thames, about 250 metres (820 ft) north of it, in the south of the City.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Thomas Rolph". www.cricketarchive.com. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  2. 1 2 3 J. Venn and J. A. Venn. "Alumni Cantabrigienses: Thomas Rolph". www.archive.org/Cambridge University Press. p. 349. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  3. "Scorecard: Cambridge University v Cambridge Town Club". www.cricketarchive.com. 10 May 1860. Retrieved 9 March 2015.