Thomas Roper, 1st Viscount Baltinglass

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Thomas Roper, 1st Viscount Baltinglass (c.1587 – 18 February 1638) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and peer.

Roper served as a distinguished military commander of the English royal army in Ireland during the reign of James I, having fought at a young age in the Tudor conquest of Ireland. He was knighted at Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin on 16 September 1603 and was invested as member of the Privy Council of Ireland. On 10 November 1626 he obtained a grant of the monastery and Lordship of Baltinglass from The Crown. On 27 June 1627 he was created Viscount Baltinglass and Baron of Bantry in the Peerage of Ireland. [1] [2]

The Tudor conquestof Ireland took place under the Tudor dynasty, which held the Kingdom of England during the 16th century. Following a failed rebellion against the crown by Silken Thomas, the Earl of Kildare, in the 1530s, Henry VIII was declared King of Ireland in 1542 by statute of the Parliament of Ireland, with the aim of restoring such central authority as had been lost throughout the country during the previous two centuries.

Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin Church in Ireland

Christ Church Cathedral, more formally The Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, is the cathedral of the United Dioceses of Dublin and Glendalough and the cathedral of the ecclesiastical province of the United Provinces of Dublin and Cashel in the (Anglican) Church of Ireland. It is situated in Dublin, Ireland, and is the elder of the capital city's two medieval cathedrals, the other being St Patrick's Cathedral.

The Privy Council of Ireland was an institution of the Kingdom of Ireland until 31 December 1800 and of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1801 to 1922. It performed a similar role in the Dublin Castle administration in Ireland to that of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom in the government of the United Kingdom.

He married Ann Harington, daughter of Sir Henry Harington and Ruth Pilkington, with whom he had three children. He was buried on 20 February 1638 at Church of St. John the Evangelist, Dublin. He was succeeded by his eldest son, also called Thomas. [3]

The Church of St. John the Evangelist was a former Church of Ireland church located on the west side of Fishamble Street in the centre of Dublin, Ireland. It was founded in the 12th century, and a great many of its parish records survive.

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References

  1. ThePeerage.com (entry #73757) http://www.thepeerage.com/p7376.htm#i73757 (Accessed 7 March 2015)
  2. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (1910), Cokayne, George Edward (main author) and Vicary Gibbs (added author), (New edition. 13 volumes in 14. London: St. Catherine Press,1910-), vol. 1 p. 397
  3. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (1910), Cokayne, George Edward (main author) and Vicary Gibbs (added author), (New edition. 13 volumes in 14. London: St. Catherine Press,1910-), vol. 1 p. 397
Peerage of Ireland
New creation Viscount Baltinglass
2nd creation
1627–1638
Succeeded by
Thomas Roper