Thomas Ross (Pennsylvania politician)

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Thomas Ross (December 1, 1806 – July 7, 1865) was a Representative to the United States Congress from Pennsylvania.

United States Congress Legislature of the United States

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the Federal Government of the United States. The legislature consists of two chambers: the House of Representatives and the Senate.

Pennsylvania State of the United States of America

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey to the east.

Son of Mary Ross (1774–1845) and John Ross (1770–1834), Thomas Ross was born in Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania. He attended the Doylestown, Pennsylvania, schools. He graduated from Princeton College in 1823. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1829 and commenced practice in Doylestown.

John Ross, was a Representative to the U.S. Congress from Pennsylvania.

Easton, Pennsylvania City in Pennsylvania, United States

Easton is a city in and the county seat of Northampton County, Pennsylvania, United States. The city's population was 26,800 as of the 2010 census. Easton is located at the confluence of the Delaware River and the Lehigh River, roughly 55 miles (89 km) north of Philadelphia and 70 miles (110 km) west of New York City.

Northampton County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Northampton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 297,735. Its county seat is Easton. The county was formed in 1752 from parts of Bucks County. Its namesake was Northamptonshire and the county seat of Easton is named for the country house Easton Neston.

He was appointed deputy attorney general of the State for Bucks County in 1829. He was frequently a candidate of the Democratic Party and was also affiliated with the Anti-Masonic Party.

Bucks County, Pennsylvania County in Pennsylvania, United States

Bucks County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 625,249, making it the fourth-most populous county in Pennsylvania and the 99th-most populous county in the United States. The county seat is Doylestown. The county is named after the English county of Buckinghamshire or more precisely, its shortname.

Democratic Party (United States) political party in the United States

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party. Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party.

The Anti-Masonic Party, also known as the Anti-Masonic Movement, was the first third party in the United States. It strongly opposed Freemasonry as a single-issue party and later aspired to become a major party by expanding its platform to take positions on other issues. After emerging as a political force in the late 1820s, most of the Anti-Masonic Party's members joined the Whig Party in the 1830s and the party disappeared after 1838.

Ross was elected as a Democrat from Pennsylvania's 6th congressional district to the Thirty-first and Thirty-second Congresses. The district was one previously represented by his father. He resumed the practice of law in Doylestown. He was buried in Doylestown Cemetery.

Pennsylvanias 6th congressional district

Pennsylvania's 6th Congressional District is a congressional district in the state of Pennsylvania. It includes the entirety of Chester County, the city of Reading and its southeastern suburbs in Berks County. The district is represented by Chrissy Houlahan. The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania redrew the district in February 2018 after ruling the previous map unconstitutional.

31st United States Congress

The Thirty-first United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1849, to March 4, 1851, during the 16 months of the Zachary Taylor presidency and the first eight months of the administration of Millard Fillmore's. The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Sixth Census of the United States in 1840. The Senate had a Democratic majority, while there was a Democratic plurality in the House.

32nd United States Congress

The Thirty-second United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1851, to March 4, 1853, during the last two years of Millard Fillmore's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Sixth Census of the United States in 1840. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

Sources

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Samuel A. Bridges
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 6th congressional district

1849–1853
Succeeded by
William Everhart


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