Thomas Rouse

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Sir Thomas Rouse, 1st Baronet (27 March 1608 – 26 May 1676) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1654 and 1660 and supported the Parliamentary cause during the English Civil War.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Roundhead name given to the supporters of the Parliament during the English Civil War

Roundheads were supporters of the Parliament of England during the English Civil War (1641–1652). Also known as Parliamentarians, they fought against King Charles I of England and his supporters, known as the Cavaliers or Royalists, who claimed rule by absolute monarchy and the principle of the 'divine right of kings'. The goal of the Roundhead party was to give the Parliament supreme control over executive administration of the country/kingdom.

English Civil War series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Biography

Rouse was the son of Sir John Rouse of Rouse Lench, Worcestershire who was MP in 1626. He matriculated at Brasenose College, Oxford on 20 October 1626 and was awarded BA from Corpus Christi, Oxford on 31 January 1628. Also in 1628, he entered Middle Temple. He was created Baronet Rouse of Rouse Lench on 23 July 1641. [1]

Sir John Rouse was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1626.

Brasenose College, Oxford college of the University of Oxford

Brasenose College (BNC), officially The King's Hall and College of Brasenose, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. It was founded in 1509, with the library and chapel added in the mid-17th century and the new quadrangle in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Middle Temple one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.

Rouse was added to the Committee for Worcestershire in 1645 and was High Sheriff of Worcestershire in 1648. [1] In 1654, he was elected Member of Parliament for Worcestershire in the First Protectorate Parliament. [2] He was an assessment commissioner in 1656 and was also Custos Rotulorum in 1656. [1]

This is a list of sheriffs and since 1998 high sheriffs of Worcestershire.

Worcestershire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented until 1832 by two Members of Parliament traditionally referred to as Knights of the Shire. It was split then into two two-member divisions, for Parliamentary purposes, Worcestershire Eastern and Worcestershire Western constituencies.

First Protectorate Parliament

The First Protectorate Parliament was summoned by the Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell under the terms of the Instrument of Government. It sat for one term from 3 September 1654 until 22 January 1655 with William Lenthall as the Speaker of the House.

In 1660, Rouse was elected MP for Evesham in the Convention Parliament. [2] He became a J.P. on 10 July 1660. [1]

Evesham was a parliamentary constituency in Worcestershire which was represented in the British House of Commons. Originally a parliamentary borough consisting of the town of Evesham, it was first represented in 1295. After this its franchise lapsed for several centuries, but it then returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) from 1604 until 1868, when its representation was reduced to one member under the Representation of the People Act 1867.

Convention Parliament (1660)

The Convention Parliament followed the Long Parliament that had finally voted for its own dissolution on 16 March that year. Elected as a "free parliament", i.e. with no oath of allegiance to the Commonwealth or to the monarchy, it was predominantly Royalist in its membership. It assembled for the first time on 25 April 1660.

Rouse died at the age of 67 and was buried at Rouse Lench,where there is a monument.

Rouse married firstly Jane Ferrers daughter of Sir John Ferrers of Tamworth Castle, secondly Frances Murray daughter of David Murray and thirdly Ann. [1]

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Richard Salwey
John James
Member of Parliament for Worcestershire
1654–1656
With: Edward Pitt
Nicholas Lechmere
John Bridges 1654
Talbot Badger 1654
James Berry 1656
John Nanfan 1656
Succeeded by
Nicholas Lechmere
Thomas Foley