Thomas Roydon

Last updated

Thomas Roydon
In office
1553–1557
Constituency Truro

Thomas Roydon (c. 1521-c. 1565) was an English merchant in the tin trade and politician. In jeux,[ clarification needed ] and three subsequent parliaments, he was a Member of Parliament for Truro. [1]

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

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Merchant businessperson who trades in commodities that were produced by others

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Tin Chemical element with atomic number 50

Tin is a chemical element with the symbol Sn (from Latin: stannum) and atomic number 50. It is a post-transition metal in group 14 of the periodic table of elements. It is obtained chiefly from the mineral cassiterite, which contains stannic oxide, SnO2. Tin shows a chemical similarity to both of its neighbors in group 14, germanium and lead, and has two main oxidation states, +2 and the slightly more stable +4. Tin is the 49th most abundant element and has, with 10 stable isotopes, the largest number of stable isotopes in the periodic table, thanks to its magic number of protons. It has two main allotropes: at room temperature, the stable allotrope is β-tin, a silvery-white, malleable metal, but at low temperatures it transforms into the less dense grey α-tin, which has the diamond cubic structure. Metallic tin does not easily oxidize in air.

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References

  1. Stanley T. Bindoff, John S. Roskell, Lewis Namier, Romney Sedgwick, David Hayton, Eveline Cruickshanks, R. G. Thorne, P. W. Hasler, The House of Commons: 1509 - 1558; 1, Appendices, constituencies, members A - C, Volume 4 (1982), p. 225; Google Books