Thomas Rush

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Sir Thomas Rush (or Russhe) (by 1487– June,1537), born in Sudbourne, Suffolk, England, was an English serjeant-at-arms who served Henry VII and Henry VIII and was knighted by the latter at the coronation of Anne Boleyn in 1533. He was also appointed High Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1533.

Sudbourne village in the United Kingdom

Sudbourne is a village and civil parish in Suffolk, England, located approximately 2 miles (3 km) north of Orford.

Suffolk County of England

Suffolk is an East Anglian county of historic origin in England. It has borders with Norfolk to the north, Cambridgeshire to the west and Essex to the south. The North Sea lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Contents

Career

Thomas Rush was a local politician in Ipswich who had served Henry VII as well as his son Henry VIII. He was a friend of Cardinal Wolsey (Henry VIII's first Lord Chancellor), survived the fallout from Wolsey's downfall, and attached himself to Wolsey's successor Thomas Cromwell. He was one of the King's sergeants-at-arms, the forerunners of the Yeomen of the Guard ("Beefeaters"); Debrett's Knightage says that he was one of those made a "Knight of the Bath" as part of the coronation ceremonies of Anne Boleyn. [1]

Ipswich Town and Borough in England

Ipswich is a large historical town in Suffolk, England, located in East Anglia about 66 miles (106 km) north east of London. It is also the county town of Suffolk. The town has been continuously occupied since the Saxon period, and its port has been one of England's most important for the whole of its history.

Henry VII of England King of England, 1485–1509

Henry VII was the King of England and Lord of Ireland from his seizure of the crown on 22 August 1485 to his death on 21 April 1509. He was the first monarch of the House of Tudor.

Henry VIII of England 16th-century King of England

Henry VIII was King of England from 1509 until his death. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father, Henry VII. Henry is best known for his six marriages, in particular his efforts to have his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon, annulled. His disagreement with the Pope on the question of such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England and dissolved convents and monasteries, for which he was excommunicated. Henry is also known as "the father of the Royal Navy"; he invested heavily in the Navy, increasing its size greatly from a few to more than 50 ships.

Family

Sir Thomas married Anne Rivers, daughter of John Rivers of Ipswich, and fathered six children: Arthur, Thomas, Leonard, Anthony, John, and an unnamed daughter. Leonard and John did not survive infancy. Sir Thomas later married a woman named Christian, but produced no more children. [2]

Legacy

Sir Thomas is interred in St. Stephen's Church in Ipswich, which no longer functions as a church. [3]

A popular misconception is that Sir Thomas' most famous name-bearing descendant is Dr. Benjamin Rush, signer of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. Dr. Rush is Sir Thomas' descendant through the latter's eponymous son.<ref>[The Rush Family History of Northwest Jersey, compiled by Pearl Rush Cressman and Kaye N. Cressman, 1965]

Benjamin Rush American physician, educator, author

Benjamin Rush was a signer of the Declaration of Independence (U.S.) and a civic leader in Philadelphia, where he was a physician, politician, social reformer, humanitarian, and educator as well as the founder of Dickinson College. Rush attended the Continental Congress and signed the Declaration of Independence. His later self-description there was: "He aimed right." He served as Surgeon General of the Continental Army and became a professor of chemistry, medical theory, and clinical practice at the University of Pennsylvania.

United States Declaration of Independence announcement by which the American colonies declared their independence from Great Britain and thus founded the United States

The United States Declaration of Independence is the statement adopted by the Second Continental Congress meeting at the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on July 4, 1776. The Declaration announced that the Thirteen Colonies at war with the Kingdom of Great Britain would regard themselves as thirteen independent sovereign states, no longer under British rule. With the Declaration, these new states took a collective first step toward forming the United States of America. The declaration was signed by representatives from New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.

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References

  1. Genealogical researcher Craig Scott of Maidenhead, England, in a 1998 email correspondence.
  2. Benjamin Rush, M.D. (1745-1813), his origins and ancestry, by A.R. Rush.
  3. Suffolk Churches Site