Thomas Russell (died 1632)

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Thomas Russell (1577–1632) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1601.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Russell was the son of Sir John Russell of Strensham. He matriculated at St John's College, Oxford on 5 November 1591, aged 14. In 1601, he was elected Member of Parliament for Worcestershire. He was knighted on 11 May 1603. He was High Sheriff of Worcestershire in 1604. [1] In 1610 he and his son William were granted the office of Masters of the Game in Malvern Chase. [2]

St Johns College, Oxford college of the University of Oxford

St John's College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford. Founded as a men's college in 1555, it has been coeducational since 1979. Its founder, Sir Thomas White, intended to provide a source of educated Roman Catholic clerics to support the Counter-Reformation under Queen Mary.

Worcestershire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented until 1832 by two Members of Parliament traditionally referred to as Knights of the Shire. It was split then into two two-member divisions, for Parliamentary purposes, Worcestershire Eastern and Worcestershire Western constituencies.

This is a list of sheriffs and since 1998 high sheriffs of Worcestershire.

He is sometimes associated with the Thomas Russell who sat for Truro in 1614, but while the identity of this man is not clear, it is likely he was a different individual. [3] Russell had become a recusant by this point, and would not have been re-elected to the Commons. [1]

Truro (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Truro was the name of a parliamentary constituency in Cornwall represented in the House of Commons of England and later of Great Britain from 1295 until 1800, then in the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1918 and finally from 1950 to 1997. Until 1885 it was a parliamentary borough, electing two members of parliament (MPs) by the plurality-at-large system of election; the name was then transferred to the surrounding county constituency, which elected a single Member by the first past the post system. In 1997, although there had been no changes to its boundaries, it was renamed as Truro and St Austell, reflecting the fact that St Austell by then had a larger population than Truro.

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References

  1. 1 2 RUSSELL, Thomas (1577-1632), of Strensham, Worcs. Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1558-1603, ed. P.W. Hasler, 1981
  2. RUSSELL, William (c.1602-1669), of Great Witley, Worcs.; later of Strensham, Worcs. and Charing Cross, Westminster. Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1604-1629, ed. Andrew Thrush and John P. Ferris, 2010
  3. RUSSELL, Thomas (fl.1613-1623), of Truro, Cornw. and London. Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1604-1629, ed. Andrew Thrush and John P. Ferris, 2010.
Parliament of England
Preceded by
John Lyttelton jnr
Edward Colles
Member of Parliament for Worcestershire
1601
With: Thomas Leighton
Succeeded by
Sir Henry Bromley
Sir William Lygon