Thomas Russell Hubbard House

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Thomas Russell Hubbard House
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Location220 Myrtle St., Manchester, New Hampshire
Coordinates 42°59′54″N71°27′17″W / 42.99833°N 71.45472°W / 42.99833; -71.45472 Coordinates: 42°59′54″N71°27′17″W / 42.99833°N 71.45472°W / 42.99833; -71.45472
Area0.3 acres (0.12 ha)
Built1867 (1867)
ArchitectHubbard, Thomas Russell
Architectural styleItalian Villa
NRHP reference # 88000177 [1]
Added to NRHPMarch 8, 1988

The Thomas Russell Hubbard House is a historic house at 220 Myrtle Street in Manchester, New Hampshire. The 2½-story wood frame house was built in 1867, by a farmer turned businessman and a prosperous owner of a factory and lumberyard, and is an exceptionally elaborate Italianate villa. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. [1]

Manchester, New Hampshire largest city in New Hampshire

Manchester is a city in the southern part of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. It is the most populous city in northern New England, an area comprising the states of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. As of the 2010 census the city had a population of 109,565, up slightly to 111,196 in a 2017 estimate. The combined Manchester-Nashua Metropolitan Area had a 2010 population of 400,721.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Contents

Description and history

The Thomas Russell Hubbard House is located in a residential area northeast of downtown Manchester, on the north side of Myrtle Street and across Maple Street from Wagner Park. It is a 2½-story wood frame structure, with a complex roofline. It is notable for its four-story tower, with quoined corners and an open fourth level with round arch windows. It has the deep, bracketed eaves typical of the Italianate style, and irregular massing with many projecting sections. The interior of the house is a showcase of its original owner's lumber products, with high quality woodwork using a wide variety of woods, and fine marble fireplace surrounds. [2]

The house was built in 1867 on an entire city block of land purchased by Thomas Russell Hubbard in 1864 from the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. Hubbard grew up on a farm, and was a self-made businessman producing wooden window sashes, doors, and window blinds, as well as operating a local lumber yard. When built, the house lot afforded fine views to west, over the Merrimack River to the nearby hills. A later owner of the house was David B. Varney, who served as mayor of Manchester in the 1890s. The house originally had a period carriage house, but that was demolished when the property was subdivided for further development. [2]

Amoskeag Manufacturing Company

The Amoskeag Manufacturing Company was a textile manufacturer which founded Manchester, New Hampshire. From modest beginnings in near wilderness, it grew throughout the 19th century into the largest cotton textile plant in the world. At its peak, Amoskeag was unrivaled both for the quality and quantity of its products. But with great size came an inability to adapt. In the early 20th century, the business failed to adapt to changing economic and social conditions.

Merrimack River river in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, United States

The Merrimack River is a 117-mile-long (188 km) river in the northeastern United States. It rises at the confluence of the Pemigewasset and Winnipesaukee rivers in Franklin, New Hampshire, flows southward into Massachusetts, and then flows northeast until it empties into the Atlantic Ocean at Newburyport. From Pawtucket Falls in Lowell, Massachusetts, onward, the Massachusetts–New Hampshire border is roughly calculated as the line three miles north of the river.

See also

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. 1 2 "NRHP nomination for Thomas Russell Hubbard House". National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-05-24.