Thomas Russell Wilkins

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Thomas Russell Wilkins (6 June 1891, Toronto – 10 December 1940, Rochester, New York) was a Canadian physicist.

Rochester, New York City in Western New York

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Wilkins received in 1912 his bachelor's degree in physics from McMaster University (which was then located in Toronto). He began graduate study in physics at the University of Chicago and taught at Brandon College, where he was head of the department of mathematics and physics from 1918 to 1925. [1] In 1921 he received his PhD from the University of Chicago with his thesis Multiple valency in the ionization by alpha rays. [2] In 1924 he was an Invited Speaker at the ICM in 1924 in Toronto.

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He spent one year, 1925–1926, at the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge, England. In 1926 he joined the Physics Department of the University of Rochester in New York. In 1928 he was appointed director of the Institute of Optics. He died in Rochester on 10 December 1940. Wilkins secured photographic recordings of cosmic rays and the disintegration of radium atoms. [1]

Selected publications

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References

  1. 1 2 Thomas Russell Wilkins fonds - McMaster University
  2. Wilkins, T. R. (1921). Multiple valency in the ionization by alpha rays. U. of Chicago.