Thomas Ryan (Commandant)

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Major Thomas Ryan (c.1790??) soldier and penal administrator, was acting commandant of the second convict settlement at Norfolk Island, from July 1839 until the arrival of Alexander Maconochie in March 1840.

Norfolk Island external territory of Australia in the South Pacific Ocean, consisting of the island of the same name plus neighbouring islands

Norfolk Island is a small island in the Pacific Ocean located between Australia, New Zealand, and New Caledonia, 1,412 kilometres (877 mi) directly east of mainland Australia's Evans Head, and about 900 kilometres (560 mi) from Lord Howe Island. Together with the two neighbouring islands Phillip Island and Nepean Island it forms one of the Commonwealth of Australia's external territories. At the 2016 Australian census, it had 1748 inhabitants living on a total area of about 35 km2 (14 sq mi). Its capital is Kingston.

Although he regarded the convicts as having been sent to the island for punishment, he tried to give them hope of release at some future time. Rations were increased, meals inspected, and well behaved and willing convicts were allowed to maintain gardens.

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Major Joseph Childs (1787–1870) was a British Royal Marines officer and penal administrator; he was commandant of the second convict settlement at Norfolk Island, from 7 February 1844 to August 1846.

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The Frederick escape was an 1834 incident in which the brig Frederick was hijacked by ten Australian convicts and used to abscond to Chile, where they lived freely for two years. Four of the convicts were later recaptured and returned to Australia, where they escaped the death sentence for piracy through a legal technicality.

References

Margaret Hazzard 1910 – 19 January 1987 was an Australian author born in Hertfordshire, England.

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