Thomas Ryan (New South Wales politician)

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Thomas Vernon Ryan (26 July 1895 14 October 1972) was an Australian politician. He was a Labor Party member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1956 to 1965, representing the electorate of Auburn.

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 25 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide.

The Australian Labor Party , also known as NSW Labor and Country Labor in regional areas, is the New South Wales branch of the Australian Labor Party. The parliamentary leader is elected from and by the members of the party caucus, comprising all party members in the Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council. The party factions have a strong influence on the election of the leader. The leader's position is dependent on the continuing support of the caucus and the leader may be deposed by failing to win a vote of confidence of parliamentary members. By convention, the premier sits in the Legislative Assembly, and is the leader of the party controlling a majority in that house. The party leader also typically is a member of the Assembly, though this is not a strict party constitutional requirement. Barrie Unsworth, for example, was elected party leader while a member of the Legislative Council. He then transferred to the Assembly by winning a seat at a by-election.

New South Wales Legislative Assembly one of the two chambers of the Parliament of New South Wales

The New South Wales Legislative Assembly is the lower of the two houses of the Parliament of New South Wales, an Australian state. The upper house is the New South Wales Legislative Council. Both the Assembly and Council sit at Parliament House in the state capital, Sydney. The Assembly is presided over by the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly.

Ryan was born in Mossgiel, and was educated at Wilcannia. He worked variously in farming and mining before entering the Railways Department as a storeman. While stationed at Dubbo in the 1930s, he became actively involved in both trade unionism and the Labor Party, serving as both the secretary of the local branch of the party and in various roles for the Australian Railways Union. He also served a brief stint on the City of Dubbo council from 1936. He relocated to Sydney in 1938, and was elected to the Auburn Council in 1939. He served five years on the Auburn council, including one year as mayor in 1942. [1] [2] [3]

Mossgiel is a location in New South Wales, Australia, in Carrathool Shire. It was a township on the coach route between the Lachlan and Darling Rivers, 50 km southeast of Ivanhoe near the junction with the road to Hillston. The settlement experienced a steady decline during the 20th century. Nowadays Mossgiel township consists of one house and a community hall.

Dubbo City in New South Wales, Australia

Dubbo is a city in the Orana Region of New South Wales, Australia. It is the largest population centre in the Orana region, with a population of 38,392 at June 2018.

The Australian Railways Union (ARU) was an Australian trade union in existence from 1920 to 1993. The ARU was an industrial union, representing all types of workers employed in the rail industry, excluding locomotive enginedrivers and tradesmen in craft areas.

Ryan, a supporter of Jack Lang, resigned from the Labor Party in 1943 along with the final Lang Labor split, subsequently becoming president of the reformed splinter party. [4] He was a prominent figure in the Lang movement for the next three years, and contested the 1946 federal election as the Lang Labor candidate for West Sydney. [5] However, he resigned from Lang Labor in 1946 in protest at the preselection of Lang's son, James Lang, to contest Lang's state seat following his entry into federal politics. [6] He rejoined the Labor Party thereafter, and attempted to win Labor preselection to challenge James Lang at the 1950 election, losing to MLA Edgar Dring, whose seat had been abolished in a redistribution. [7]

Jack Lang (Australian politician) Australian politician and Premier of New South Wales

John Thomas Lang, usually referred to as J. T. Lang during his career and familiarly known as "Jack" and nicknamed "The Big Fella", was an Australian politician who twice served as the 23rd Premier of New South Wales from 1925 to 1927 and again from 1930 to 1932. He was dismissed by the Governor of New South Wales, Sir Philip Game, at the climax of the 1932 constitutional crisis and resoundingly lost the resulting election and subsequent elections as Leader of the Opposition. He later formed Lang Labor and was briefly a member of the Australian House of Representatives.

Lang Labor

Lang Labor was a faction of the Australian Labor Party (ALP) consisting of the supporters of Jack Lang, who served two terms as Premier of New South Wales and was the party's state leader from 1923 to 1939. On several occasions, its members broke away from the ALP and formed separate political parties, with representation in both state and federal parliaments.

1946 Australian federal election

Federal elections were held in Australia on 28 September 1946. All 74 seats in the House of Representatives and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Labor Party led by Prime Minister Ben Chifley defeated the opposition Liberal–Country coalition, led by Robert Menzies. It was the Liberal Party's first federal election since its creation.

Dring died in December 1955, and Ryan won Labor preselection to contest the still-vacant Auburn seat at the 1956 state election. He was easily re-elected in 1959 and 1962, but was defeated for preselection in 1965 by Peter Cox. He did not hold party parliamentary or ministerial office. [1] [8]

1956 New South Wales state election

The 1956 New South Wales state election was held on 3 March 1956. It was conducted in single member constituencies with compulsory preferential voting and was held on boundaries created at a 1952 redistribution. The election was for all of the 94 seats in the Legislative Assembly.

Peter Francis Cox AO was an Australian politician.

Ryan died at Guildford in 1972. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Mr Thomas Vernon Ryan". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 30 April 2019.
  2. "Municipal by-election". Sydney Morning Herald . 18 March 1936.
  3. "Labor ban; Progress Association; penalty may be expulsion". Sydney Morning Herald . 18 December 1934.
  4. "Lang Party Candidates; Branches to Have Recall Power". Sunday Herald . 11 April 1944.
  5. Carr, Adam. "Legislative Election of 28 September 1946". Psephos. Retrieved 29 June 2010.
  6. "Resignations of Lang Labour Party Officials". Sydney Morning Herald . 25 November 1946.
  7. "Resentment Seen". Sunday Herald . 12 March 1950.
  8. Green, Antony (2007). "New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007". Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 27 June 2010.

 

Civic offices
Preceded by
Norman Keile
Mayor of Auburn
1941–1942
Succeeded by
Bernard John Kelly
New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
Edgar Dring
Member for Auburn
1956 1965
Succeeded by
Peter Cox