Thomas S. Butler

Last updated
Thomas S. Butler
Thomas S. Butler (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Pennsylvania's 8th district
In office
March 4, 1923 May 26, 1928
Preceded by Henry W. Watson
Succeeded by James Wolfenden
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Pennsylvania's 7th district
In office
March 4, 1903 March 3, 1923
Preceded by Irving P. Wanger
Succeeded by George P. Darrow
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Pennsylvania's 6th district
In office
March 4, 1897 March 3, 1903
Preceded by John B. Robinson
Succeeded by George D. McCreary
Personal details
Born(1855-11-04)November 4, 1855
Uwchland Township, Pennsylvania
DiedMay 26, 1928(1928-05-26) (aged 72)
Washington, D.C.
Political party Republican

Thomas Stalker Butler (November 4, 1855 May 26, 1928) was a U.S. Representative born in Pennsylvania, serving from March 4, 1897 until his death, having been elected to the House sixteen times. Thomas S. Butler was also the father of the famous Marine Corps General Smedley D. Butler.

United States House of Representatives Lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house. Together they compose the national legislature of the United States.

Pennsylvania U.S. state in the United States

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern, Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey to the east.

United States Marine Corps Amphibious warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting expeditionary and amphibious operations with the United States Navy as well as the Army and Air Force. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.

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Born in Uwchlan Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, he attended the common schools, West Chester State Normal School, and Wyer’s Academy in West Chester. He later studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1877, and commenced practice in West Chester. From 1885 to 1889 and again in 1927-1928 he served as trustee of the West Chester State Normal School. Butler was appointed judge of the fifteenth judicial district of Pennsylvania in 1888 and stood as an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1889. He was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1892.

Chester County, Pennsylvania County in Pennsylvania, United States

Chester County, colloquially known as Chesco, is a county in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 498,886, increasing by 4.1% to a census-estimated 519,293 residents as of 2017. The county seat is West Chester. Chester County was one of the three original Pennsylvania counties created by William Penn in 1682. It was named for Chester, England.

West Chester, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

West Chester is a borough and the county seat of Chester County, Pennsylvania, in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The population was 18,461 at the 2010 census.

Bar (law)

In law, the bar is the legal profession as an institution. The term is a metonym for the line that separates the parts of a courtroom reserved for spectators and those reserved for participants in a trial such as lawyers.

Thomas S. Butler, center, with U.S. Navy Admiral Henry T. Mayo and an unidentified Marine Lieutenant returning from France aboard USS Siboney in August 1919. Henry T. Mayo and Thomas S. Butler.jpg
Thomas S. Butler, center, with U.S. Navy Admiral Henry T. Mayo and an unidentified Marine Lieutenant returning from France aboard USS Siboney in August 1919.

Elected to Congress in his first term as an Independent Republican, he was elected as a Republican for each succeeding term. While in Congress, he was chairman of the United States House Committee on Pacific Railroads (Fifty-ninth through Sixty-first Congresses) and member of the United States House Committee on Naval Affairs (Sixty-sixth through Seventieth Congresses).

In the politics of the United States, Independent Republican is a term occasionally adopted by members of United States Congress to refer to their party affiliation. It is also used at the state level by individuals who loosely identify with the ideals of the national Republican Party but who choose not to formally affiliate with the party.

59th United States Congress

The Fifty-ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1905, to March 4, 1907, during the fifth and sixth years of Theodore Roosevelt's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twelfth Census of the United States in 1900. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

61st United States Congress

The Sixty-first United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from March 4, 1909, to March 4, 1911, during the first two years of William H. Taft's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twelfth Census of the United States in 1900. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

During World War I, Butler read into the Congressional Record the "bogus oath", which was falsely attributed to the Roman Catholic fraternal organization Knights of Columbus, in which the oath taker pledges to war against Protestant Christians. [1] The bogus oath was refuted by the Committee on Public Information, the wartime information agency of the Woodrow Wilson administration. [2]

World War I 1914–1918 global war starting in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the resulting 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

Knights of Columbus Catholic fraternal service organization founded in 1882

The Knights of Columbus is the world's largest Catholic fraternal service organization. Founded in 1882 by Michael J. McGivney in New Haven, Connecticut, it was named in honor of the explorer Christopher Columbus. Originally serving as a mutual benefit society to working-class and immigrant Catholics in the United States, it developed into a fraternal benefit society dedicated to providing charitable services, including war and disaster relief, actively defending Catholicism in various nations, and promoting Catholic education. The Knights also support the Catholic Church's positions on public policy issues, including various political causes, and are participants in the new evangelization. The current Supreme Knight is Carl A. Anderson.

Committee on Public Information former independent agency of the government of the United States

The Committee on Public Information (1917–1919), also known as the CPI or the Creel Committee, was an independent agency of the government of the United States created to influence public opinion to support US participation in World War I.

Butler died in office and was buried in Oaklands Cemetery, West Chester, Pennsylvania. His home at West Chester, The Butler House, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. [3]

Oaklands Cemetery

Oaklands Cemetery was founded in 1854 in West Chester, Pennsylvania in the midst of the pre Civil War's rural cemetery movement, which was popular throughout the northeast. It is located at 1042 Pottstown Pike and occupies roughly 26 acres (0.11 km2).

Butler House (West Chester, Pennsylvania) United States national historic site

Butler House is a historic home located in West Chester, Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was built about 1845, and is a ​2 12-story brick dwelling in the Federal style. It has a rear ell with porch. The house has been renovated into apartments. It was the home of Congressman Thomas S. Butler (1855–1928), father of U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Smedley Butler (1881–1940). Maj. Gen. Butler grew up in the house.

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

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References

  1. "Religion: Great & Fake Oath". TIME Magazine. 1928-09-03.
  2. Egan & Kennedy 1920, p. 121.
  3. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2007-01-23.
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
John B. Robinson
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 6th congressional district

1897–1903
Succeeded by
George D. McCreary
Preceded by
Irving P. Wanger
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 7th congressional district

1903–1923
Succeeded by
George P. Darrow
Preceded by
Henry W. Watson
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district

1923–1928
Succeeded by
James Wolfenden