Thomas S. Steers

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Thomas S. Steers
Born1804
New York City, New York, United States
DiedJune 13, 1884(1884-06-13) (aged 80)
NationalityAmerican
OccupationPolice captain
Employer New York City Police Department
Known forNYPD police captain who participated in the Draft Riot of 1863
RelativesHenry V. Steers, son

Thomas S. Steers (1804  June 13, 1884) was an American law enforcement officer and police captain of the New York City Police Department during the mid-to late 19th century. He was one of the earliest police officials appointed to the Metropolitan police force serving for over twenty years until his retirement in 1870. Steers also played a prominent role in the Draft Riot of 1863. He was the father of Captain Henry V. Steers, longtime precinct captain of the Twenty-Fifth Precinct located at New York City Hall.

A captain is a police rank in some countries, such as the United States and France.

New York City Police Department municipal police force in the United States

The City of New York Police Department, more commonly known as the New York Police Department and its initials NYPD, is the primary law enforcement and investigation agency within the City of New York, New York in the United States. Established on May 23, 1845, the NYPD is one of the oldest police departments in the United States, and is the largest police force in the United States. The NYPD headquarters is at 1 Police Plaza, located on Park Row in Lower Manhattan across the street from City Hall. The department's mission is to "enforce the laws, preserve the peace, reduce fear, and provide for a safe environment." The NYPD's regulations are compiled in title 38 of the New York City Rules. The New York City Transit Police and New York City Housing Authority Police Department were fully integrated into the NYPD in 1995 by New York City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani.

A Precinct Captain, also known as a Precinct Chairman, Precinct Delegate, or Precinct Committee Officer, is an elected official in the American political party system. The office establishes a direct link between a political party and the voters in a local election district.

Contents

Biography

Thomas S. Steers was born in New York City, New York in 1804. He was educated in public schools and entered the police force in 1848. Working his way up the ranks, he eventually became a police captain in 1857 and assigned to head the Thirteenth Precinct where he remained for several years. [1]

In the early hours of the Draft Riot of 1863, Steers was one of several senior officers to lead groups to confront rioters. That afternoon at about 1:00 pm, he and a small police squad made a desperate stand at 35th Street to try and halt the mob but were overwhelmed by the rioters far larger numbers and his men fled in disorder. [2]

Steers spent his later career being transferred to several other precincts, reportedly "always doing good wherever he was", before finally retiring from active service in 1870. He lived with his family during his last years and died at the home of his daughter in Brooklyn on the morning of June 13, 1884. His funeral was held almost a week later. [1]

Brooklyn Borough in New York City and county in New York state, United States

Brooklyn is the most populous borough of New York City, with an estimated 2,648,771 residents in 2017. Named after the Dutch village of Breukelen, it borders the borough of Queens at the western end of Long Island. Brooklyn has several bridge and tunnel connections to the borough of Manhattan across the East River, and the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge connects Staten Island. Since 1896, Brooklyn has been coterminous with Kings County, the most populous county in the U.S. state of New York and the second-most densely populated county in the United States, after New York County.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Obituary. Capt. Thomas Steers" (PDF). New York Times . 1884-06-14.
  2. Asbury, Herbert. The Gangs of New York: An Informal History of the New York Underworld. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1928. (pg. 121) ISBN   1-56025-275-8

Further reading