Thomas Savage, 1st Viscount Savage

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Thomas Savage, 1st Viscount Savage (circa 1586 – 20 November 1635), known as Sir Thomas Savage, 2nd Baronet from 1615 to 1626, was an English peer and courtier in the court of Charles I.

Charles I of England 17th-century monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland

Charles I was the monarch over the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

Savage was the son and heir of Sir John Savage, 1st Baronet and his wife Mary Alington. He succeeded to his father's title shortly before 14 July 1615. [1] In 1616 he served as Deputy Lieutenant of Cheshire and he was knighted in 1617. From 1624 to 1625 he was Steward of the borough of Congleton and in 1626 served as First Commissioner of Trade. On 4 November 1626 he was raised to the peerage as Viscount Savage, of Rocksavage in the Peerage of England. [2] In 1628 he became Chancellor to Queen Henrietta Maria and remained as her councillor until 1634. He was also Ranger of Delamere Forest.

Cheshire County of England

Cheshire is a county in North West England, bordering Merseyside and Greater Manchester to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire and Shropshire to the south and Flintshire, Wales and Wrexham county borough to the west. Cheshire's county town is the City of Chester (118,200); the largest town is Warrington (209,700). Other major towns include Crewe (71,722), Ellesmere Port (55,715), Macclesfield (52,044), Northwich (75,000), Runcorn (61,789), Widnes (61,464) and Winsford (32,610)

The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. In that year, the Peerages of England and Scotland were replaced by one Peerage of Great Britain.

He married Elizabeth Darcy, Countess Rivers, daughter of Thomas Darcy, 1st Earl Rivers and Mary Kitson, on 14 May 1602. They had nineteen children. By special remainder, Savage was made heir to his father-in-law's titles, but he died before he could inherit them. Savage was succeeded in his titles by his son, John, who later became second Earl Rivers. [3]

Elizabeth Savage, Countess Rivers and Viscountess Savage was an English courtier and a Royalist victim of uprisings during the English Civil War.

Thomas Darcy, 1st Earl Rivers was an English peer and courtier.

John Savage, 2nd Earl Rivers was a wealthy English politician and Royalist from Cheshire.

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References

Peerage of England
Preceded by
New creation
Viscount Savage
1626–1635
Succeeded by
John Savage
Baronetage of England
Preceded by
John Savage
Baronet
1615–1635
Succeeded by
John Savage