Thomas Savage (bishop)

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Thomas Savage
Archbishop of York
Appointed18 January 1501
InstalledNever enthroned [1]
Term ended3 September 1507
Predecessor Thomas Rotherham
Successor Christopher Bainbridge
Other posts Bishop of Rochester
Bishop of London
Orders
Ordination1470
Consecration28 April 1493
Personal details
Born1449
Clifton Hall, Cheshire
Died3 September 1507
Cawood Castle, Yorkshire
Buried York Minster
Nationality English
Denomination Roman Catholic
ParentsSir John Savage (1422–95) (f)
Lady Katherine Stanley (m).

Dr Thomas Savage (1449, Clifton, Cheshire  – 3 September 1507, Cawood, Yorkshire) was a prelate and diplomat during the Tudor period.

Doctor is an academic title that originates from the Latin word of the same spelling and meaning. The word is originally an agentive noun of the Latin verb docēreLatin pronunciation: [dɔˈkeːrɛ] 'to teach'. It has been used as an academic title in Europe since the 13th century, when the first Doctorates were awarded at the University of Bologna and the University of Paris. Having become established in European universities, this usage spread around the world. Contracted "Dr" or "Dr.", it is used as a designation for a person who has obtained a Doctorate. In many parts of the world it is also used by medical practitioners, regardless of whether or not they hold a doctoral-level degree.

Rocksavage grade II listed ruins in the United kingdom

Rocksavage or Rock Savage was an Elizabethan mansion, now in ruins, at SJ526799 in Clifton, Cheshire, England. Built for Sir John Savage, MP in 1565–1568, Rocksavage was one of the great Elizabethan houses of the county, a leading example of the Elizabethan prodigy house; in 1674, it was the second largest house in Cheshire. James I visited in 1617. The house was abandoned when it passed into the Cholmondeley family early in the 18th century, and by 1782 only ruins remained.

Cheshire County of England

CheshireCHESH-ər, -⁠eer; archaically the County Palatine of Chester) is a county in North West England, bordering Merseyside and Greater Manchester to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire and Shropshire to the south and Flintshire, Wales and Wrexham county borough to the west. Cheshire's county town is the City of Chester (118,200); the largest town is Warrington (209,700). Other major towns include Crewe (71,722), Ellesmere Port (55,715), Macclesfield (52,044), Northwich (75,000), Runcorn (61,789), Widnes (61,464) and Winsford (32,610)

Contents

Savage served as Chaplain to King Henry VII, becoming Archbishop of York in 1501. [2]

The College of Chaplains of the Ecclesiastical Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom is under the Clerk of the Closet, an office dating from 1437. It is normally held by a diocesan bishop, who may however remain in office after leaving his see. The current Clerk is James Newcome, Bishop of Carlisle.

Archbishop of York second most senior bishop of the Church of England

The Archbishop of York is a senior bishop in the Church of England, second only to the Archbishop of Canterbury. The archbishop is the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of York and the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, which covers the northern regions of England as well as the Isle of Man. The Archbishop of York is an ex officio member of the House of Lords and is styled Primate of England.

1501 Year

Year 1501 (MDI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Family and studies

Savage arms SavageFamilyCrest.gif
Savage arms

The second son of the many children of Sir John Savage (1422–1495) and Lady Catherine née Stanley, daughter of Lord Stanley, [3] Sir John Savage, KG, was his elder brother.

Thomas Stanley, 1st Baron Stanley English peer and King of Mann

Sir Thomas Stanley, 1st Baron Stanley, titular King of Mann, KG, of Lathom and Knowsley, Lancashire, was a Privy Councillor, Comptroller of the Royal Household, Lieutenant-Governor of Ireland (1431–36), Chief Steward of the Duchy of Lancaster, Knight of the Shire for Lancashire, Constable & Justice of Chester, Chamberlain of North Wales, Lord Chamberlain (1455), and from 15 January 1456 was summoned by Writ to Parliament as Lord Stanley.

After graduating from Oxford University, proceeding Master of Arts c. 1473, Savage was sent abroad to further his studies in divinity, first at Bologna and then, in 1477, at the University of Padua, receiving a doctorate of Canon Law before serving there as Jurist Rector (1481–82). [4] He was awarded the degree of LLD (Cantab) in 1495.

A Master of Arts is a person who was admitted to a type of master's degree awarded by universities in many countries, and the degree is also named Master of Arts in colloquial speech. The degree is usually contrasted with the Master of Science. Those admitted to the degree typically study linguistics, history, communication studies, diplomacy, public administration, political science, or other subjects within the scope of the humanities and social sciences; however, different universities have different conventions and may also offer the degree for fields typically considered within the natural sciences and mathematics. The degree can be conferred in respect of completing courses and passing examinations, research, or a combination of the two.

Divinity divine mythological character

In religion, divinity or Godhead is the state of things that are believed to come from a supernatural power or deity, such as God, the supreme being, creator deity, or spirits, and are therefore regarded as sacred and holy. Such things are regarded as divine due to their transcendental origins or because their attributes or qualities are superior or supreme relative to things of the Earth. Divine things are regarded as eternal and based in truth, while material things are regarded as ephemeral and based in illusion. Such things that may qualify as divine are apparitions, visions, prophecies, miracles, and in some views also the soul, or more general things like resurrection, immortality, grace, and salvation. Otherwise what is or is not divine may be loosely defined, as it is used by different belief systems.

University of Bologna university in Bologna, Italy

The University of Bologna is a research university in Bologna, Italy. Founded in 1088 by an organised guild of students, it is the oldest university in the world, as well as one of the leading academic institutions in Italy and Europe. It is one of the most prestigious Italian universities, commonly ranking in the first places of national rankings.

Through Savage marriages with the various Cheshire county families, he was related to Archbishop Lawrence Booth.

Viscount Savage was a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1626 for Sir Thomas Savage, 2nd Baronet, husband of Elizabeth Savage and heir-apparent by special remainder to his father-in-law's titles of Baron Darcy of Chiche (1613), Viscount Colchester (1621) and Earl Rivers (1626).

Lawrence Booth 15th-century Archbishop of York and Chancellor of England

Lawrence Booth served as Prince-Bishop of Durham and Lord Chancellor of England, before being appointed Archbishop of York.

Career

Savage was appointed Rector of Davenham, Cheshire, 1470; Rector of Jacobstow, Devon, 1474; Rector of Monks Risborough, Buckinghamshire, 1484; and Rector of Rostherne, Cheshire. Such advowsons provided him with a source of income whilst he pursued his diplomatic activities abroad.

A rector is, in an ecclesiastical sense, a cleric who functions as an administrative leader in some Christian denominations. In contrast, a vicar is also a cleric but functions as an assistant and representative of an administrative leader. The term comes from the Latin for the helmsman of a ship.

Davenham village in the United Kingdom

Davenham is a rural village and civil parish approximately 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) south of the town of Northwich, part of the Borough of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire in England. It has a population of 5,655, reducing following reorganisation to 2,745 at the 2011 Census. The village is close to the A556 and A533 roads and both the River Dane and River Weaver. It is the birthplace of marathon world record holder, Paula Radcliffe.

Jacobstow civil parish and village in north Cornwall, England

Jacobstow is a civil parish and village in north Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. The village is located east of the A39 road approximately seven miles (11 km) south of Bude.

He served as English ambassador to Castile and Portugal in 1488, and then to France in 1490, where he participated to no avail in the conference at Boulogne.

On 3 December 1492, Dr Savage was nominated as Bishop of Rochester being consecrated on 28 April 1493, a post he held until 1496 when he was translated to the see of London [5] As Bishop of London, Savage served as president of the council attendant on the king and dean of the household chapel of Henry VII, before being appointed on 18 January 1501 as Archbishop of York, which post he held until his death. [6] [7] While Archbishop he led the marriage ceremony of Arthur, Prince of Wales, to Catherine of Aragon. Prince Arthur died young, and his brother Henry, who became Henry VIII, then married Princess Catherine.

"A Lancastrian in politics, he was much trusted and employed by Henry VII....he was a courtier by nature, and took part in the great ceremonies of his time, the creation of Prince Henry as Duke of York, the meeting with the Archduke Philip, and the reception of Catherine of Aragon." [8]

Death

Archbishop Savage's body is buried at York Minster where his effigy remains. His heart was later interred in the Savage Chapel of Macclesfield Church, Cheshire. [9]

Citations

  1. Jones, B., ed. (1963). "Archbishops of York". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1300-1541: Volume 6, Northern Province (York, Carlisle and Durham). British History Online. London: Institute of Historical Research. pp. 3–5. Retrieved 24 November 2016.
  2. Sutherland, Douglas, 2007, p.724.
  3. The Visitation of Cheshire 1580 by several heralds, edited by John Paul Rylands, F.S.A., London, 1882, p.203–4.
  4. Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry, Baltimore, Md., 2007, p.724, ISBN   0-8063-1759-0
  5. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 268
  6. Harriss, et al. Rulers and Ruled p. 242, Retrieved 24 November 2016
  7. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 283
  8. Lee, Sidney, ed. (1897). "Savage, Thomas (d.1507)"  . Dictionary of National Biography . 50. London: Smith, Elder & Co. p. 362.
  9. Richardson, Douglas, 2007, p.724

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References


Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Edmund Audley
Bishop of Rochester
1493–1497
Succeeded by
Richard FitzJames
Preceded by
Richard Hill
Bishop of London
1497–1501
Succeeded by
William Warham
Preceded by
Thomas Rotherham
Archbishop of York
1501–1507
Succeeded by
Christopher Bainbridge