Thomas Scott, 2nd Earl of Clonmell

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Thomas Scott, 2nd Earl of Clonmell (15 August 1783 – 18 January 1838), styled Lord Earlsfort between 1793 and 1798, was an Irish peer and politician.

Scott was the only son of John Scott, 1st Earl of Clonmell, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench for Ireland, by his second wife, Margaret, daughter of Patrick Lawless, a Dublin banker. He became known by the courtesy title Lord Earlsfort when his father was elevated to an earldom in 1793. [1]

John Scott, 1st Earl of Clonmell judge and politician

John Scott, 1st Earl of Clonmell PC (Ire) KC SL, known as The Lord Earlsfort between 1784 and 1789 and as The Viscount Clonmell between 1789 and 1793, was an Irish barrister and judge. Sometimes known as "Copperfaced Jack", he was Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench for Ireland from 1784 to 1798.

Dublin capital and largest city in Ireland

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A courtesy title is a form of address in systems of nobility used for children, former wives and other close relatives of a peer, as well as certain officials such as some judges and members of the Scottish gentry. These styles are used 'by courtesy' in the sense that the relatives, officials and others do not themselves hold substantive titles. There are several different kinds of courtesy titles in the British peerage.

Scott succeeded his father in the earldom in 1798, aged 14. As this was an Irish peerage, he was still eligible for election to the British House of Commons. [1] In 1807 he was returned to parliament for New Romney, a seat he held until 1812. [1] [2]

The Peerage of Ireland consists of those titles of nobility created by the English monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland, or later by monarchs of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The creation of such titles came to an end in the 19th century. The ranks of the Irish peerage are Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount and Baron. As of 2016, there were 135 titles in the Peerage of Ireland extant: two dukedoms, ten marquessates, 43 earldoms, 28 viscountcies, and 52 baronies. The Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland continues to exercise jurisdiction over the Peerage of Ireland, including those peers whose titles derive from places located in what is now the Republic of Ireland. Article 40.2 of the Irish Constitution forbids the state conferring titles of nobility and a citizen may not accept titles of nobility or honour except with the prior approval of the Government. As stated above, this issue does not arise in respect of the Peerage of Ireland, as no creations of titles in it have been made since the Constitution came into force.

New Romney was a parliamentary constituency in Kent, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1371 until 1832, when it was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Lord Clonmell married Lady Henrietta Louisa, daughter of George Greville, 2nd Earl of Warwick, on 9 February 1805. They had two sons and seven daughters. He died at North Aston, Oxfordshire, in January 1838, aged 54, and was succeeded by his eldest son, John. The Countess of Clonmell only survived her husband by ten months and died at St Leonards-on-Sea, Sussex, in November 1838. [1]

George Greville, 2nd Earl of Warwick British politician and Earl

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North Aston village and civil parish in Cherwell district, Oxfordshire, England

North Aston is a village and civil parish about 7 12 miles (12 km) south of Banbury and 10 miles (16 km) north of Oxford. The 2001 Census recorded its population as 212. The 2011 Census did not publish its population separately, but gave a combined total of 316 for the parishes of North Aston and Middle Aston.

Oxfordshire County of England

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References

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
William Windham
John Perring
Member of Parliament for New Romney
1807–1812
With: Hon. George Ashburnham
Succeeded by
Sir John Duckworth
William Mitford
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
John Henry Scott
Earl of Clonmell
1798–1838
Succeeded by
John Henry Scott