Thomas Seccombe

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Thomas Seccombe (18661923) was a miscellaneous English writer and, from 1891 to 1901, assistant editor of the Dictionary of National Biography , [1] in which he wrote over 700 entries. He was educated at Felsted and Balliol College, Oxford, taking a first in Modern History in 1889.

Writer person who uses written words to communicate ideas and to produce works of literature

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<i>Dictionary of National Biography</i> multi-volume reference work

The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published since 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.

Felsted School is an English co-educational day and boarding independent school, situated in Felsted in Essex, England. It is in the British Public School tradition, and was founded in 1564 by Richard Rich, 1st Baron Rich. Felsted is one of the 12 founder members of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference, and a full member of the Round Square Conference of world schools. Felsted School has been awarded the Good Schools Guide award twice and is regularly featured in Tatler's Schools Guide.

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References

  1. "SECCOMBE, Thomas". Who's Who. Vol. 59. 1907. p. 1577.
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Wikisource-logo.svg  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain :  Cousin,John William (1910). A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature .London:J. M. Dent & Sons. Wikisource  

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John William Cousin (1849–1910) was a British writer, editor and biographer. He was one of six children born to William and Anne Ross Cousin, his mother being a noted hymn-writer, in Scotland. A fellow of the Faculty of Actuaries and secretary of the Actuarial Society of Edinburgh, he revised and wrote the introduction for Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Evangeline in 1907.

<i>A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature</i> collection of biographies of writers by John William Cousin

A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature is a collection of biographies of writers by John William Cousin (1849–1910), published in 1910. Most of the entries consist of only one paragraph but some entries, like William Shakespeare's, are quite lengthy.

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