Thomas Seget

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Thomas Seget (Seton?, 1569 – Amsterdam, 1627) was a Scottish poet who wrote in Latin. [1]

Cockenzie and Port Seton town

Cockenzie and Port Seton is a unified town in East Lothian, Scotland. It is on the coast of the Firth of Forth, four miles east of Musselburgh. The burgh of Cockenzie was created in 1591 by James VI of Scotland. Port Seton harbour was built by George Seton, 11th Lord Seton between 1655 and 1665.

Amsterdam Capital of the Netherlands

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Latin Indo-European language of the Italic family

Latin is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet.

Seget is first recorded as a convert from Calvinism to Catholicism, attending the Scots College at Louvain in 1596, but did not stay long. Carrying a letter of recommendation from Justus Lipsius, the Flemish humanist, he travelled to Italy where he met Galileo in 1599. He travelled further through Europe, making the acquaintances among others of Kepler in Prague. [2] He also corresponded with the Polish poet Szymon Szymonowic, and other Polish connections included his stay at the University of Altdorf 1614–1616 at the same time as the Socinian activity there around Samuel Przypkowski. [3] [4]

Calvinism Protestant branch of Christianity

Calvinism is a major branch of Protestantism that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice set down by John Calvin and other Reformation-era theologians.

Justus Lipsius Southern-Netherlandish philologist

Justus Lipsius was a Flemish philologist, philosopher and humanist. Lipsius wrote a series of works designed to revive ancient Stoicism in a form that would be compatible with Christianity. The most famous of these is De Constantia. His form of Stoicism influenced a number of contemporary thinkers, creating the intellectual movement of Neostoicism. He taught at the universities in Jena, Leiden and Leuven.

Prague Capital city in Czech Republic

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His album amicorum, held at the Vatican Library, contains inscriptions by several distinguished literary men and scientists: among them, Justus Lipsius, Abraham Ortelius, Gian Vincenzo Pinelli, Erycius Puteanus, Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc, Paolo Sarpi and, most notably, Galileo. [5]

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Gian Vincenzo Pinelli Italian Renaissance humanist

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James VI and I was King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625. The kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states, with their own parliaments, judiciaries, and laws, though both were ruled by James in personal union.

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References

  1. Alasdair A. MacDonald, Michael Lynch, Ian Borthwick Cowan The Renaissance in Scotland: studies in literature, religion, history, and
  2. Edward Rosen Thomas Seget of Seton (1569 or 1570–1627) Edinburgh University Press, 1949.
  3. Otakar Odlozilik, "Thomas Seget: A Scottish friend of Szymon Szymonowic", Polish Review , vol. 11, no. 1, 1966.
  4. Magyar Könyvszemle 97. évf. 1981. 3. szám
  5. Gattei, Stefano (2013). "The Wandering Scot: Thomas Seget's album amicorum". Nuncius . 23 (2): 345–463.