Thomas Sexton (English politician)

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Thomas Miles Sexton (1879 – 11 July 1946) [1] was a Labour Party politician in England.

The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom which has been described as an alliance of social democrats, democratic socialists and trade unionists. The party's platform emphasises greater state intervention, social justice and strengthening workers' rights.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

He was elected at the 1935 general election as Member of Parliament (MP) for Barnard Castle in County Durham, and held seat until he stood down at the 1945 election. [2] He died the following year, aged 67.

Barnard Castle was a county constituency centred on the town of Barnard Castle in County Durham, which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was created for the 1885 general election and abolished for the 1950 general election.

County Durham County of England

County Durham is a county in North East England. The county town is Durham, a cathedral city. The largest settlement is Darlington, closely followed by Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees. It borders Tyne and Wear to the north east, Northumberland to the north, Cumbria to the west and North Yorkshire to the south. The county's historic boundaries stretch between the rivers Tyne and Tees, thus including places such as Gateshead, Jarrow, South Shields and Sunderland.

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References

  1. "House of Commons constituencies beginning with "B" (part 1)". Leigh Rayment's House of Commons pages. Retrieved 2009-04-19.
  2. Craig, F. W. S. (1983) [1969]. British parliamentary election results 1918–1949 (3rd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 338. ISBN   0-900178-06-X.
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Cuthbert Headlam
Member of Parliament for Barnard Castle
19351945
Succeeded by
Sydney Lavers