Thomas Shannon (rugby league)

Last updated
Thomas Shannon
Personal information
Full nameThomas Shannon
Bornunknown
Diedunknown
Playing information
Position Stand-off
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1930/31–45/46 Widnes 2997610230
1940Wigan (guest)10000
Total3007610230
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1938 England 21003
Source: [1] [2]

Thomas "Tommy" Shannon (birth unknown – death unknown) was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s and 1940s. He played at representative level for England, and at club level for Widnes, as a stand-off, i.e. number 6. [1] He also appeared for Wigan as a World War II guest player. [3]

Rugby league Full-contact sport played by two teams of thirteen players on a rectangular field

Rugby league is a full-contact sport played by two teams of thirteen players on a rectangular field measuring 68m wide and 112-122m long. One of the two codes of rugby, it originated in Northern England in 1895 as a split from the Rugby Football Union over the issue of payments to players. Its rules progressively changed with the aim of producing a faster, more entertaining game for spectators.

England national rugby league team sportsteam that represents England

The England national rugby league team represents England in international rugby league.

Widnes Vikings Rugby League team based in Widnes

The Widnes Vikings are an English professional rugby league club based in Widnes, Cheshire that plays in the Betfred Championship. The club plays its home matches at the Halton Stadium. Founded as Widnes Football Club, they are one of the original twenty-two rugby clubs that formed the Northern Rugby Football Union in 1895, making them one of the world's first rugby league teams. Their historic nickname is "The Chemics" after the main industry in Widnes, but now they use their modern nickname, "The Vikings".

Contents

Playing career

International honours

Tommy Shannon won caps for England while at Widnes in 1938 against Wales (2 matches). [2]

Cap (sport) Term for a players appearance in a game at international level

In sport, a cap is a metaphorical term for a player's appearance in a game at international level. The term dates from the practice in the United Kingdom of awarding a cap to every player in an international match of association football. In the early days of football, the concept of each team wearing a set of matching shirts had not been universally adopted, so each side would distinguish itself from the other by wearing a specific sort of cap.

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Tommy Shannon played stand-off in Widnes' 5-11 defeat by Hunslet in the 1933–34 Challenge Cup Final during the 1933–34 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 5 May 1934, and scored a try in the 18-5 victory over Keighley in the 1936–37 Challenge Cup Final during the 1936–37 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 8 May 1937.

Five-eighth

Five-eighth or Stand-off is one of the positions in a rugby league football team. Wearing jersey number 6, this player is one of the two half backs in a team, partnering the scrum-half. Sometimes known as the pivot or second receiver, in a traditional attacking 'back-line' play, the five-eighth would receive the ball from the scrum half, who is the first receiver of the ball from the dummy-half or hooker following a tackle.

Hunslet R.L.F.C.

Hunslet R.L.F.C. is a professional rugby league club in Hunslet, South Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, which plays in Betfred League 1. The club was founded in 1973 as New Hunslet, they became Hunslet in 1979 and the club were the Hunslet Hawks between 1995 and 2016.

The 1933–34 Challenge Cup was the 34th staging of rugby league's oldest knockout competition, the Challenge Cup during the 1933–34 season.

County Cup Final appearances

Tommy Shannon played stand-off in Widnes' 4-5 defeat by Swinton in the 1939–40 Lancashire County Cup Final first-leg during the 1939–40 season at Naughton Park, Widnes on Saturday 20 April 1940, and played stand-off in the 11-16 defeat (15-21 aggregate defeat) by Swinton in the 1939–40 Lancashire County Cup Final second-leg during the 1939–40 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 27 April 1940.

Swinton Lions

The Swinton Lions are a professional rugby league club based in Swinton, Greater Manchester, England, which competes in the Championship. The club has won the Championship six times and three Challenge Cups. Before 1996, the club was known simply as Swinton.

The 1939–40 Lancashire Cup was the thirty-second occasion on which the Lancashire Cup completion had been held. Due to the start of the Second World War, the competition was delayed until early 1940. Swinton won the trophy by beating Widnes on a two legged final by the score of 21-15 aggregate.
The first leg was played at Naughton Park, Widnes, and the second led was played at Station Road, Swinton.
Swinton won both legs, 5-4 away and 16-11 at home.
The attendances were 5,500 at Widnes and 9,000 at Swinton.

Historically, English rugby league clubs competed for the Lancashire Cup and the Yorkshire Cup, known collectively as the county cups. The leading rugby clubs in Yorkshire had played in a cup competition for several years prior to the schism of 1895. However, the Lancashire authorities had refused to sanction a similar tournament, fearing it would lead to professionalism.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 31 March 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  3. Latham, Michael; Gate, Robert (1992). They played for Wigan. Adlington: Mike R.L. ISBN   978-0-9516098-2-8.