Thomas Shaw, 1st Baron Craigmyle

Last updated

Thomas Shaw Thomas Shaw MP.jpg
Thomas Shaw

Thomas Shaw, 1st Baron Craigmyle PC (23 May 1850 – 28 June 1937), known as The Lord Shaw from 1909 to 1929, was a Scottish radical [1] Liberal Party politician and judge.

Contents

The son of Alexander Shaw of Dunfermline, Fife, Craigmyle was educated at the Dunfermline High School and at Edinburgh University. He was appointed an advocate in 1875 and became a Queen's Counsel in 1894. He gained an LLD from St Andrews University in October 1902 [2] and from the University of Aberdeen in 1906 and was also Hamilton Fellow in Mental Philosophy at Edinburgh University.

Craigmyle sat as Member of Parliament (MP) for Hawick Burghs from 1892 to 1909 [3] and served as Solicitor General for Scotland from 1894 to 1895 and as Lord Advocate from December 1905 [4] to 1909. He resigned from parliament and ministerial office and was created a life peer as Baron Shaw, of Dunfermline in the County of Fife, on 20 February 1909, [5] so that he could sit in the House of Lords and serve as a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary. He retired from this office in 1929 and was made an hereditary peer as Baron Craigmyle, of Craigmyle in the County of Aberdeen, on 7 Mar 1929. [6]

Lord Craigmyle married Elspeth, daughter of George Forrest, in 1879. [7] He died in June 1937, aged 87, and was succeeded in the hereditary barony by his son Alexander. Lady Craigmyle died in 1939.

Arms

Coat of arms of Thomas Shaw, 1st Baron Craigmyle
Crest
A demi-savage holding in his dexter hand a club resting on his shoulder Proper.
Escutcheon
Ermine a fir tree growing out of a mount in base Proper between two piles Azure issuing from a chief Gules charged with a scroll Argent with seal pendant Proper.
Supporters
Misericordia Fidelitas Jus (Mercy Fidelity Right) [8]

Notes

  1. Fry, M. (5 February 1987). Patronage and Principle: A Political History of Modern Scotland. Aberdeen University Press. ISBN   9780080350639.
  2. "University intelligence". The Times. No. 36906. London. 23 October 1902. p. 9.
  3. Craig, F. W. S. (1989) [1974]. British parliamentary election results 1885–1918 (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 511. ISBN   0-900178-27-2.
  4. "No. 27864". The London Gazette . 15 December 1905. p. 9008.
  5. "No. 28238". The London Gazette . 2 April 1909. p. 2589.
  6. "No. 33493". The London Gazette . 10 May 1929. p. 3124.
  7. "SHAW, Rt. Hon. Thomas". Who's Who. Vol. 59. 1907. p. 1591.
  8. Debrett's Peerage. 1921.

Related Research Articles

The peerage in the United Kingdom is a legal system comprising both hereditary and lifetime titles, composed of various noble ranks, and forming a constituent part of the British honours system. The term peerage can be used both collectively to refer to the entire body of nobles, and individually to refer to a specific title. British peerage title holders are termed peers of the Realm. The peerage's fundamental roles are ones of government, peers being eligible to a seat in the House of Lords, and of meritocracy, the receiving of any peerage being the highest of British honours. In the UK, five peerages or peerage divisions co-exist, namely:

Peerage Act 1963 United Kingdom legislation

The Peerage Act 1963 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that permitted women peeresses and all Scottish hereditary peers to sit in the House of Lords, and which allows newly inherited hereditary peerages to be disclaimed.

James Abercromby, 1st Baron Dunfermline British politician (1776–1858)

James Abercromby, 1st Baron Dunfermline, was a British barrister and Whig politician. He served as Speaker of the House of Commons between 1835 and 1839.

Viscount Hailsham Title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom

Viscount Hailsham, of Hailsham in the County of Sussex, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1929 for the lawyer and Conservative politician Douglas Hogg, 1st Baron Hailsham, who twice served as Lord High Chancellor of the Great Britain. He had already been created Baron Hailsham, of Hailsham in the County of Sussex, in 1928, also in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Hogg was the son of the merchant and philanthropist Quintin Hogg, seventh son of Sir James Hogg, 1st Baronet, whose eldest son James McGarel-Hogg, 2nd Baronet was created Baron Magheramorne in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1887.

Viscount Falkland Hereditary title in the Peerage of Scotland

Viscount Falkland is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. Referring to the royal burgh of Falkland in Fife, it was created in 1620, by Scottish King James VI, for Sir Henry Cary, although he was actually English and had no connection to Scotland. He was made Lord Cary at the same time, also in the Peerage of Scotland. His son, the second Viscount, was a prominent statesman. The latter's younger son, the fourth Viscount, notably served as Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire. His son, the fifth Viscount, represented several constituencies in the House of Commons and held office as First Lord of the Admiralty from 1693 to 1694. The Falkland Islands in the south Atlantic are named after him.

Earl of Onslow Earldom in the Peerage of the United Kingdom

Earl of Onslow, of Onslow in the County of Shropshire and of Clandon Park in the County of Surrey is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1801 for George Onslow, 4th Baron Onslow.

Viscount Colville of Culross, in the County of Perth, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 15 July 1902 for the politician and courtier, Charles Colville, 10th Lord Colville of Culross. He had already been created Baron Colville of Culross, in the County of Perth, in 1885, also in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. As of 2018, the titles are held by his great-great-grandson, the fifth Viscount, who succeeded his father in 2010. The fourth Viscount was a judge and politician. Lord Colville of Culross was one of the ninety elected hereditary peers that remained in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act 1999, and sat as a crossbencher.

Viscount Camrose, of Hackwood Park in the County of Hampshire, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 20 January 1941 for the prominent newspaper magnate William Berry, 1st Baron Camrose. He had previously received the award of Baronet, of Long Cross in the County of Surrey, in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom, on 4 July 1921, and was created Baron Camrose, of Long Cross in the County of Surrey, on 19 June 1929, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. His second son, the third Viscount, disclaimed the peerages in 1995 on succeeding his elder brother. However, he had already been created a life peer as Baron Hartwell, of Peterborough Court in the City of London, on 19 January 1968. On his death in 2001 the life peerage became extinct while he was succeeded in the other titles by his eldest son, the fourth Viscount. The first three Viscounts all headed The Daily Telegraph at one point, the first having purchased it from Harry Levy-Lawson, 1st Viscount Burnham, but in the 1980s they lost control to Conrad Black.

Baron Glenarthur Barony in the Peerage of the United Kingdom

Baron Glenarthur, of Carlung in the County of Ayr, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1918 for the Scottish businessman Sir Matthew Arthur, 1st Baronet. He had already been created a baronet, of Carlung in the County of Ayr, on 28 November 1902. The title of the barony was derived from the joining of his mother's maiden surname name of Glen and his patronymic Arthur.

Baron Selsdon, of Croydon in the County of Surrey, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 14 January 1932 for the Conservative politician Sir William Mitchell-Thomson, 2nd Baronet. His son, the second Baron, was a successful racing driver, winning the 1949 24 Hours of Le Mans in the first Ferrari. As of 2009 the titles are held by the second Baron's only son, the third Baron, who succeeded in 1963. He is one of the ninety elected hereditary peers that remain in the House of Lords after the House of Lords Act of 1999. Lord Selsdon sits on the Conservative benches. The Mitchell-Thomson Baronetcy, of Polmood in the County of Peebles, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 26 September 1900 for the first Baron's father, Sir Mitchell Mitchell-Thomson, Lord Provost of Edinburgh from 1897 to 1900.

Baron Trevethin and Oaksey Barony in the Peerage of the United Kingdom

Baron Trevethin, of Blaengawney in the County of Monmouth, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1921 for the prominent judge Sir Alfred Lawrence, Lord Chief Justice of England from 1921 to 1922.

Baron Craigmyle, of Craigmyle in the County of Aberdeen, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in May 1929 for the Liberal politician and judge Thomas Shaw, Baron Shaw. He had already in 1909 been given a life peerage under the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876 as Baron Shaw, of Dunfermline in the County of Fife. He served as a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary in the House of Lords from 1909 to 1929, when he was rewarded with a hereditary peerage. On his death in 1937 the life peerage became extinct while he was succeeded in the hereditary barony by his son, the second Baron. He notably represented Kilmarnock in Parliament as a Liberal. As of 2009 the title is held by the latter's grandson, the fourth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1998.

Baron Chorley, of Kendal in the County of Westmorland, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 16 November 1945 for the barrister, academic and Labour politician, Robert Chorley. He was Sir Ernest Cassel Professor of Commercial and Industrial Law at the University of London from 1930 to 1946 and served as a Lord-in-waiting from 1946 to 1950 in the Labour administration of Clement Attlee. The second Baron, who succeeded his father in 1978, was one of the ninety elected hereditary peers elected remain in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act of 1999, where he sat as a cross-bencher. As of 2016 the title is held by his son.

David Hope, Baron Hope of Craighead British judge (born 1938)

James Arthur David Hope, Baron Hope of Craighead, is a retired Scottish judge who served as the first Deputy President of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom from 2009 until his retirement in 2013, having previously been the Second Senior Lord of Appeal in Ordinary. He served as Convenor of the Crossbench peers in the House of Lords from 2015 to 2019.

James Patrick Bannerman Robertson, Baron Robertson,, was a Scottish judge and Conservative politician.

Wilfrid Normand, Baron Normand

Wilfrid Guild Normand, Baron Normand,, was a Scottish Unionist Party politician and judge. He was a Scottish law officer at various stages between 1929 and 1935, and a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1931 to 1935. He was Lord President of the Court of Session from 1935 until he became a Law Lord in 1947.

John Hamilton, 1st Viscount Sumner

John Andrew Hamilton, 1st Viscount Sumner, was a British lawyer and judge. He was appointed a judge of the High Court of Justice in 1909, a Lord Justice of Appeal in 1912 and a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary in 1913. Created a life peer as Baron Sumner in 1913, he was further honoured when he was granted a hereditary peerage as Viscount Sumner in 1927.

Alexander Shaw, 2nd Baron Craigmyle Scottish politician

Alexander Shaw, 2nd Baron Craigmyle was a Scottish Liberal Party politician.

John Hamilton-Gordon, 1st Marquess of Aberdeen and Temair

John Campbell Hamilton-Gordon, 1st Marquess of Aberdeen and Temair,, known as The 7th Earl of Aberdeen from 1870 to 1916, was a British politician. Born in Edinburgh, Lord Aberdeen held office in several countries, serving twice as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and serving from 1893 to 1898 as Governor General of Canada.

Thomas Shaw, 3rd Baron Craigmyle, was a British aristocrat, a prominent convert to Roman Catholicism and a philanthropist.

References

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Hawick Burghs
1892–1909
Succeeded by
Legal offices
Preceded by Solicitor General for Scotland
1894–1895
Succeeded by
Preceded by Lord Advocate
1905–1909
Succeeded by
Peerage of the United Kingdom
New creation Baron Craigmyle
1929–1937
Succeeded by