Thomas Sherwin

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Thomas Sherwin
Sherwin, Thomas.JPG
BornJuly 11, 1839
Boston, Massachusetts
DiedDecember 19, 1914
Boston, Massachusetts
Allegiance Union
Service/branch Union Army
Years of service1861–1865
Rank Union Army LTC rank insignia.png Lieutenant Colonel
Union Army brigadier general rank insignia.svg Bvt. Brigadier General
Unit 22nd Massachusetts Infantry
Commands held1st Brigade, 1st Division, V Corps
Battles/wars American Civil War
Other workPresident, New England Telephone and Telegraph Company
Detail of Thomas Sherwin's grave in the Old Village Cemetery Detail of Thomas Sherwin's grave.jpg
Detail of Thomas Sherwin's grave in the Old Village Cemetery

Thomas Sherwin (July 11, 1839 December 19, 1914) was an American Civil War general and executive. He was the son of educator Thomas Sherwin, master of the English High School of Boston. The younger Sherwin taught in Dedham, Massachusetts before the war. He enlisted in the 22nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in 1861 as a lieutenant. [1]

Contents

He was wounded at the Battle of Gaines' Mill on June 27, 1862. On April 3, 1866, [2] President Andrew Johnson nominated Sherwin for the award of the honorary grade of brevet brigadier general, United States Volunteers, to rank from March 13, 1865, for distinguished gallantry at the Battle of Gettysburg and for gallant and meritorious services during the war, [3] The U.S. Senate confirmed the award on May 18, 1866. [4] [5]

See also

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References

  1. Browne, Patrick. "22nd Massachusetts Infantry at Gettysburg" . Retrieved 2013-11-01.
  2. Eicher 2001, p. 755.
  3. Hunt 1990, p. 553.
  4. Eicher 2001, p. 757.
  5. "Gen. Thomas Sherwin Dead" (PDF). New York Times. December 20, 1914. Retrieved June 15, 2010.

Works cited