Thomas Sim Lee

Last updated

  1. "Elizabeth Digges Horsey, MSA SC 3520-14927" . Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  2. Secretary of State of Maryland (1915). Maryland Manual 1914–1915: A Compendium of Legal, Historical and Statistical Information relating to the State of Maryland. Annapolis, Maryland, USA: The Advertiser-Republican.
  3. "Mary Digges Lee, Maryland Women's Hall of Fame" . Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  4. "Thomas Sim Lee, MSA SC 3520-0800" . Retrieved August 1, 2016.

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References

Thomas Sim Lee
Governor of Maryland
In office
November 12, 1779 November 22, 1782
Political offices
Preceded by Governor of Maryland
1779–1782
Succeeded by
Preceded by
James Brice
Acting Governor
Governor of Maryland
1792–1794
Succeeded by