Thomas Simpson (engineer)

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Thomas Simpson
Born 1755
Blackwell, Carlisle, Cumberland
Died 1823
Nationality British
Occupation Engineer
Engineering career
Discipline civil engineer

Thomas Simpson (1755–1823) was a British civil engineer. [1]

United Kingdom Country in Europe

The United Kingdom, officially the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland but more commonly known as the UK or Britain, is a sovereign country lying off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state‍—‌the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east, the English Channel to the south and the Celtic Sea to the south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world. The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain and Ireland. With an area of 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi), the United Kingdom is the 78th-largest sovereign state in the world. It is also the 22nd-most populous country, with an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017.

Civil engineer engineer specialising in design, construction and maintenance of the built environment

A civil engineer is a person who practices civil engineering – the application of planning, designing, constructing, maintaining, and operating infrastructures while protecting the public and environmental health, as well as improving existing infrastructures that have been neglected.

Contents

Career

Simpson was born in Blackwell, Carlisle and began his career in 1778 as a millwright until being appointed an inspector and engineer of the Chelsea Waterworks. He later also became an engineer at Lambeth Waterworks Company. He contributed to the introduction of iron fresh water pipes and replacement of wooden mains in London and throughout the United Kingdom, testifying before a Parliamentary select committee in 1821 that he had invented a method of making spigot and socket joints watertight by filling them with hemp or flax and then covering them in lead. He also built a workshop to repair and maintain steam engines in 1785, which his son James Simpson took over and developed into James Simpson and Co. Ltd, later Worthington-Simpson Ltd, which after several further mergers currently trades as Flowserve. [2]

Carlisle Cathedral city in Cumbria, England

Carlisle is a historic city and the county town of Cumbria. Historically in Cumberland, it is also the administrative centre of the City of Carlisle district in North West England. Carlisle is located at the confluence of the rivers Eden, Caldew and Petteril, 10 miles (16 km) south of the Scottish border. It is the largest settlement in the county of Cumbria, and serves as the administrative centre for both Carlisle City Council and Cumbria County Council. At the time of the 2001 census, the population of Carlisle was 71,773, with 100,734 living in the wider city. Ten years later, at the 2011 census, the city's population had risen to 75,306, with 107,524 in the wider city.

A millwright is a high-precision craftsman or tradesman who installs, dismantles, repairs, reassembles, and moves machinery in factories, power plants, and construction sites.

Chelsea Waterworks Company

The Chelsea Waterworks Company was a London waterworks company founded in 1723 which supplied water to many central London locations throughout the 18th and 19th centuries until its functions were taken over by the Metropolitan Water Board in 1902.

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References

  1. A. W. Skempton (2002). A Biographical Dictionary of Civil Engineers in Great Britain and Ireland: 1500-1830. Thomas Telford. pp. 612–. ISBN   978-0-7277-2939-2 . Retrieved 27 October 2012.
  2. Gwilym Roberts (1 January 2006). Chelsea to Cairo-- 'Taylor-Made' Water Through Eleven Reigns and in Six Continents: A History of John Taylor & Sons and Their Predecessors. Thomas Telford. pp. 8–. ISBN   978-0-7277-3411-2 . Retrieved 27 October 2012.