Thomas Sinnickson (merchant)

Last updated

Thomas Sinnickson (December 21, 1744 – May 15, 1817) was an American merchant and statesman from Salem, New Jersey. He represented New Jersey at-large in the U.S. House in 1789–1791 and again in 1797–1799. [1]

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Salem, New Jersey City in Salem County, New Jersey, U.S.

Salem is a city in Salem County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 5,146, reflecting a decrease of 711 (−12.1%) from the 5,857 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 1,026 (−14.9%) from the 6,883 counted in the 1990 Census, an overall drop of more than 25% over the two decades. It is the county seat of Salem County, the state's most rural county. The name "Salem", in both the city and county, is derived from the Hebrew word shalom, meaning "peace".

Beginning from its inception into statehood, New Jersey elected its representatives At-large instead of from individual districts. This continued for most years until 1843, with the exception of the years 1799-1801, and 1813-1815 when they were elected in districts. After 1843, New Jersey returned to district representation. 4 at-large representatives were elected in 1789 until 1793 when a 5th representative was added. 6 seats were allocated beginning in 1803, continuing until At-large representation ceased in 1843.

He was the granduncle of Clement Hall Sinnickson and uncle of Thomas Sinnickson. He was born near Salem, Salem County, New Jersey, December 21, 1744; completed preparatory studies; engaged in mercantile pursuits; served as captain in the Continental Army; held several local offices; member of the New Jersey General Assembly in 1777, 1782, 1784, 1785, 1787, and 1788; elected to the First Congress (March 4, 1789 – March 3, 1791); elected as a Federalist to the Fifth Congress (March 4, 1797 – March 3, 1799); died in Salem, N.J., May 15, 1817; interment in St. John's Episcopal Cemetery, in Salem.

Clement Hall Sinnickson New Jersey politician, United States Representative

Clement Hall Sinnickson, was an American Republican Party politician, who served in the United States House of Representatives, where he represented New Jersey's 1st congressional district from 1875 to 1879. He is the grandnephew of Thomas Sinnickson, who was also a former Representative from New Jersey.

Salem County, New Jersey County in the United States

Salem County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. Its western boundary is formed by the Delaware River and it has the eastern terminus of the Delaware Memorial Bridge, connecting to New Castle, Delaware. Its county seat is Salem. The county is part of the Delaware Valley area. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county's population was 62,792, making it the state's least populous county, representing a 5.0% decrease from the 66,083 enumerated at the 2010 Census, in turn increasing by 1,798 (+2.8%) from the 64,285 counted in the 2000 Census, retaining its position as the state's least populous county. The most populous place was Pennsville Township, with 13,409 residents at the time of the 2010 Census. Lower Alloways Creek Township covers 72.46 square miles (187.7 km2), the largest total area of any municipality.

Continental Army Colonial army during the American Revolutionary War

The Continental Army was formed by the Second Continental Congress after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the ex-British colonies that became the United States of America. Established by a resolution of the Congress on June 14, 1775, it was created to coordinate the military efforts of the Thirteen Colonies in their revolt against the rule of Great Britain. The Continental Army was supplemented by local militias and volunteer troops that remained under control of the individual states or were otherwise independent. General George Washington was the commander-in-chief of the army throughout the war.

Related Research Articles

John Eager Howard American politician

John Eager Howard was an American soldier and politician from Maryland. He was elected as governor of the state in 1788, and served three one-year terms. He also was elected to the Continental Congress, the Congress of the United States and the U.S. Senate. In the 1816 presidential election, Howard received 22 electoral votes for vice president on the Federalist Party ticket with Rufus King. The ticket lost in a landslide.

John Henry was the eighth Governor of Maryland and member of the United States Senate. He was born at his family's estate (Weston), located near Vienna in Dorchester County.

Finns Point is a small strategic promontory in Pennsville Township, Salem County, New Jersey, and New Castle County, Delaware, located at the southwest corner of the New Jersey peninsula, on the east bank of the Delaware River near its mouth on Delaware Bay. Due to the wording of the original charter defining the boundaries of New Jersey and Delaware, part of the promontory is actually enclosed within the state of Delaware's border, due to tidal flow and the manner in which the borders between New Jersey and Delaware were first laid out. Therefore, this portion of Finns Point is an exclave of Delaware, cut off from the rest of the state by Delaware Bay. The area is about 10 miles (16 km) south of the city of Wilmington, and directly across the Delaware River from the New Castle area, and the Delaware River entrance to the Chesapeake & Delaware Canal. Pea Patch Island, part of the state of Delaware, sits in the channel of the river facing the promontory.

John Vining American politician

John Middleton "Jack" Vining was an American lawyer and politician from Dover, in Kent County, Delaware. He was a Continental Congressman from Delaware, and a member of the Federalist Party, who served in the Delaware General Assembly and as United States Representative and United States Senator from Delaware.

Nicholas Van Dyke (U.S. senator) American politician and lawyer

Nicholas Van Dyke was an American lawyer and politician from New Castle, Delaware. He was a member of the Federalist Party, who served in the Delaware General Assembly, as Attorney General of Delaware, as U.S. Representative from Delaware, and as U.S. senator from Delaware.

Thomas Sinnickson was an American jurist and statesman from Salem, New Jersey. He represented New Jersey in the United States House of Representatives in 1828-1829.

John Johns Trigg was an American farmer and politician from Bedford County, Virginia, United States. He fought with the Virginia militia in the Revolutionary War and represented Virginia in the U.S. Congress from 1797 until 1804.

Gunning Bedford Sr. was an American lawyer and politician from New Castle, in New Castle County, Delaware. He was an officer in the Continental Army during the American Revolution, and a member of the Federalist Party, who served in the Delaware General Assembly and as Governor of Delaware. He is often confused with his cousin, Gunning Bedford Jr., who was a delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention of 1787.

Charles Goldsborough American politician

Charles Goldsborough served as the 16th Governor of the state of Maryland in the United States in 1819.

John Condit American politician

John Condict, a.k.a. Condit was a United States Representative and a United States Senator from New Jersey and father of United States Representative Silas Condit.

Aaron Kitchell was a blacksmith and politician from Hanover Township, New Jersey. He represented New Jersey in both the United States House of Representatives and the Senate.

Henry M. Ridgely American politician

Henry Moore Ridgely was an American lawyer and politician from Dover, in Kent County, Delaware. He was a member of the Federalist Party, and later the Democratic Party, who served as U.S. Representative from Delaware and as U.S. Senator from Delaware.

William H. Wells American politician

William Hill Wells was a lawyer and politician from Dagsboro, in Sussex County, Delaware. He was a member of the Federalist Party, who served in the Delaware General Assembly and as U.S. Senator from Delaware.

St. John's Episcopal Cemetery is a cemetery in Salem, the historic county seat of Salem County.

George Latimer was a Philadelphia merchant and member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. He served as speaker of the Pennsylvania House 1794–1798.

The 1789 United States House of Representatives elections in New York were held on March 3 and 4, 1789, to elect 6 U.S. Representatives to represent the State of New York in the 1st United States Congress.

The 1790 United States House of Representatives elections in New York were held from April 27 to 29, 1790, to elect six U.S. Representatives to represent the State of New York in the United States House of Representatives.

The 1798 United States House of Representatives elections in New York were held from April 24 to 26, 1798, to elect ten U.S. Representatives to represent the State of New York in the United States House of Representatives of the 6th United States Congress.

Sinnickson may refer to:

References

  1. Vuorinen, Asko (December 27, 2012). "The Delaware Finns" . Retrieved 2013-07-27. Second notable Finn, who was the first representative of New Jersey in United States Congress, was Thomas Sinnicksson. He was born in December 21, 1744 in Salem County, New Jersey. He served as a captain in the Revolutionary Army in New Jersey Militia. He was elected as Federalist to the first Congress (1789-1791) and to the fifth Congress (March 4, 1797-March 3, 1799). He died in Salem, New Jersey, May 15, 1817 and was buried in St’Johns’s Episcopal Cemetery. His grandfather was Broer Sinnick, who arrived in Delaware in 1656 in a ship Mercurius. His name comes from his mother’s name Sinikka, because his mother and father were not married. His son was Bruer Sinnexson, who had a son James Sinex. The descendants in a line were James Jr., Henry and Henry Jr. Henry Junior had a son Thomas Sinnickson, who became the congressman. Thomas married Hannah Llewellyn in 1814 in Philadelphia. They had ten children and their descendants have been documented. One of them is his grandson Clement Hall Sinnickson (1834-1919), who was also a representative of New Jersey in U.S. Congress (1875-79). He served in Civil War in Union Army.

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

The Political Graveyard website and database on American political figures

The Political Graveyard is a website and database that catalogues information on more than 277,000 American political figures and political families, along with other information.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov .

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Seat created
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's at-large congressional district

1789–1791
Succeeded by
Aaron Kitchell
Preceded by
Isaac Smith
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's at-large congressional district

1797–1799
Succeeded by
James Mott