Thomas Skeffington-Lodge

Last updated

Lodge Thomas Skeffington-Lodge.jpg
Lodge

Thomas Cecil Skeffington-Lodge [1] (15 January 1905 – 23 February 1994) [2] was a British Labour Party politician. He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Bedford from 1945 to 1950.

Contents

Family

He was from a Yorkshire farming family which owned 2,000 acres. His mother, Winifred Skeffington, was a suffragette and his father, Thomas Lodge, from the famous Lodge family, American and British.

Political career

Skeffington-Lodge fought Bedford at the 1945 general election and unexpectedly defeated the Conservative incumbent Richard Wells, by just 288 votes. He only served one term, however, before being beaten in 1950 by Winston Churchill's son-in-law Christopher Soames.

Despite never gaining election to Parliament again, Skeffington-Lodge fought a number of other elections across the country in the Labour cause. At the 1951 general election he was beaten at York by just 921 votes. He went on to fight Mid Bedfordshire in 1955, Grantham in 1959 and Brighton Pavilion in a 1969 by-election.

Outside politics

In 1969, he successfully sued novelist Francis King for libel, claiming that he had been caricatured as a female character in King's novel A Domestic Animal, which King was subsequently forced to re-edit with Skeffington-Lodge's involvement before publication. [3] [4]

Related Research Articles

Bill Rodgers, Baron Rodgers of Quarry Bank British politician

William Thomas Rodgers, Baron Rodgers of Quarry Bank, PC is a British politician who served as Secretary of State for Transport from 1976 to 1979, and was one of the 'Gang of Four' of senior British Labour Party politicians who defected to form the Social Democratic Party (SDP). He subsequently helped to lead the SDP into the merger that formed the Liberal Democrats in 1988, and later served as that party's leader in the House of Lords between 1997 and 2001.

1945 United Kingdom general election National election in the United Kingdom

The 1945 United Kingdom general election was a national election held on 5 July 1945, but polling in some constituencies was delayed by some days, and the counting of votes was delayed until 26 July to provide time for overseas votes to be brought to Britain. The governing Conservative Party sought to maintain its position in Parliament but faced challenges from public opinion about the future of the United Kingdom in the post-war period. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill proposed to call for a general election in Parliament, which passed with a majority vote less than two months after the conclusion of the Second World War in Europe.

1951 United Kingdom general election General election held in the United Kingdom

The 1951 United Kingdom general election was held twenty months after the 1950 general election, which the Labour Party had won with a slim majority of just five seats. The Labour government called a snap election for Thursday 25 October 1951 in the hope of increasing its parliamentary majority. However, despite winning the popular vote and achieving both the highest-ever total vote and highest percentage vote share, Labour won fewer seats than the Conservative Party. This election marked the return of Winston Churchill as Prime Minister, and the beginning of Labour's thirteen-year spell in opposition. This was the final general election to be held with George VI as monarch, as he died the following year on 6 February and was succeeded by his daughter, Elizabeth II. This was also the last election in which the Conservatives did better in Scotland than in England.

Frank Soskice

Frank Soskice, Baron Stow Hill, was a British lawyer and Labour Party politician.

Canterbury (UK Parliament constituency) UK Parliament constituency since 1295

Canterbury is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2017 by Rosie Duffield of the Labour Party.

Bedford (UK Parliament constituency) UK Parliament constituency in England

Bedford is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2017 by Mohammad Yasin of the Labour Party.

Frederick Lee, Baron Lee of Newton, PC was a British Labour Party politician and peer.

Evelyn Mansfield King was a British member of parliament for both the Labour Party and then the Conservative Party.

Wednesbury was a borough constituency in England's Black Country which returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1868 until it was abolished for the February 1974 general election.

Frank Markham British politician (1897–1975)

Sir Sydney Frank Markham was a British politician who represented three constituencies, each on behalf of a different party, in Parliament.

George Lindgren, Baron Lindgren

George Samuel Lindgren, Baron Lindgren, JP, DL was a British Labour Party politician.

Eugene Joseph Squire Hargreaves Ramsden, 1st Baron Ramsden OBE, known as Sir Eugene Ramsden, Bt between 1938 and 1945, was a Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom.

Arthur Massey Skeffington was a British Labour Party politician who served as a Member of Parliament (MP) for 23 years from 1945 until his death in 1971.

The 1940 Kettering by-election was a parliamentary by-election held on 6 March 1940 for the British House of Commons constituency of Kettering in Northamptonshire.

Louis Gluckstein

Sir Louis Halle Gluckstein was a British lawyer and Conservative Party politician.

Will Appleton

Sir William Appleton was a New Zealand local body politician, advertising agent and leading company director. He was Mayor of Wellington for two terms from 1944 to 1950 after serving as a city councillor from 1931 to 1944. He was knighted in 1950.

Sir Walter Robert Dempster Perkins, also known as Robert Perkins, was a Conservative Party politician in England.

Ivor Owen Thomas was a British trade unionist and Labour Party politician.

Walter Windsor was a British Labour Party politician. A native of Bethnal Green in the East End of London, he held a seat in the House of Commons from 1923 to 1929, and from 1935 to 1945, when he died.

Harold Roberts was a British solicitor and Unionist (Conservative) politician. After a long career in local government in Birmingham, he represented the city in the House of Commons for the last five years of his life.

References

  1. "Gazette Issue 37238 published on the 24 August 1945. Page 3 of 32". www.london-gazette.co.uk. 24 August 1945. Archived from the original on 8 March 2014. Retrieved 3 June 2021.
  2. Dalyell, Tam (26 February 1994). "Obituary: Tom Skeffington-Lodge" . The Independent. London. Archived from the original on 7 May 2022.
  3. D.J. Taylor, "A Case of Mistaken Identity", The Guardian, 14 April 2007.
  4. F. King, “Yesterday Came Suddenly”, Constable, 1993

Sources

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Bedford
19451950
Succeeded by